Middle East & North Africa

Political and economic change has continued to dominate the Middle East and North Africa region. Throughout the region, CIPE’s partners have served as a source of skills, knowledge, and inspiration for citizens advocating for democratic institutions and free markets. CIPE’s programs in the MENA region are well-positioned to help a broad range of citizens build democratic institutions by supporting efforts that expand political and economic opportunity and empower stakeholders.

Program Highlights in the MENA Region

  • CIPE and its partners are playing a key role in shaping the language of democratic and free-market reform in the Arabic language. A Google search in Arabic for such fundamental concepts as ‘Democratic Governance’ (الحوكمة الديمقراطية), ‘Governance’ (حوكمة) , ‘ Entrepreneurship’ (ريادية الأعمال) , ‘Corporate Citizenship’ (مواطنة الشركات), ‘Business Association’ (جمعيات الأعمال), as well as the Anglicized word ‘Hawkama’ (meaning ‘Governance’ in Arabic), yields CIPE’s Arabic-language website as the first result.
  • In Tunisia, CIPE supported the Institut arabe des chefs d’entreprises (IACE) to promote corporate governance (CG) practices vital to reducing the corruption and abuse that were at the root of Tunisia’s revolution. Two of Tunisia’s largest state-owned enterprises have also sought IACE’s help to improve their governance and increase accountability to their ultimate stakeholders – the citizens of Tunisia.

Read more about CIPE's programs in the Middle East & North Africa.

News by Region

Middle East and North Africa Weekly Updates

Washington, DC - The MoU signed at CIPE headquarters on November 18 outlines

Government and Private Sector of Yemen hold dialogue in support of Yemen's economic development

WASHINGTON, DC -- A Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of Yemen and the Yemen

Publication by Region

Reforming the Entrepreneurship Ecosystem: A Study on Barriers to Growth in Tunisia and Egypt

Article at a glance

  • This article summarizes the main barriers to entry and growth as experienced by entrepreneurs and business owners in Egypt and Tunisia, and looks at regional differences within each country, differences between formal and informal enterprises, and differences by gender of business owners.
  • Top barriers to growth in 2013 were reported to be political instability and public disorder, administrative inefficiency, and restrained access to finance. Even among formal businesses, informal mechanisms often compensate for the absence of effective state institutions and the rule of law.
  • Administrative reforms and deeper investments in infrastructure and human capital are needed to build the business-friendly ecosystem needed to generate jobs, grow the economy, and create opportunities for all citizens

Read the original Stanford study here.

Building a Shared Vision for Economic Reform in Yemen

Following the 2011 popular uprising that toppled a decades-long authoritarian regime, Yemen b

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