Democracy that Delivers #26: Nancy Hendry Discusses the Pervasive, but Often Ignored Problem of “Sextortion”

Podcast guest Nancy Henderson (left) and guest host Laura Van Voorhees.

Podcast guest Nancy Henderson (left) and guest host Laura Van Voorhees.

International Association of Women Judges’ Senior Advisor Nancy Hendry discusses IAWJ’s work addressing “sextortion.” The IAWJ coined the term to describe a pervasive, but often ignored, form of sexual exploitation and corruption that occurs when people in positions of authority – whether government officials, judges, educators, law enforcement personnel, or employers – seek to extort sexual favors in exchange for something within their power to grant or withhold. In effect, sextortion is a form of corruption in which sex, rather than money, is the currency of the bribe.  Although it is a prevalent practice in many countries, it often is not discussed in the context of corruption issues because corruption is generally associated with financial exchanges.

Created in 1991, the International Association of Women Judges (IAWJ) is a non-profit, non-governmental organization whose members represent all levels of the judiciary worldwide and share a commitment to equal justice and the rule of law. The IAWJ currently has approximately 4,600 members in 75 countries and areas worldwide.

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Closing the Gender Gap in Political and Economic Participation

Photo: CIPE

Photo: CIPE

By Yini Wu

“In high school, boys and girls are equally interested in running for office in the future. But by college graduation, young women’s political ambitions drop dramatically.”

The voice of women and youth is considerably underrepresented in political leadership positions worldwide, and engaging young women in public service is “the first step” to deal with the gender gap in political ambitions. “We have to start with young women in universities, even in high schools,” said Michelle Bekkering, Senior Gender Advisor at IRI, “and help them to really understand the essence of politics.”

In a recent event on closing the gender gap in leadership, Bikkering discussed approaches to increasing the percentage of women holding public service positions and addressing the barriers that female candidates face with Sandra Pepera, Director for Gender, Women and Democracy at NDI, and Jessica Reis, Vice President of Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research.

CIPE also believes in the power of women and youth, and has been dedicated to empowering women and youth around the world through its international programs. CIPE’s youth programs empower talented young professionals worldwide as the political leaders of tomorrow by providing them opportunities and necessary tools to actually engage in the policymaking process.

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Using Technology to Strengthen Civil Society in Cambodia

Photo: CIPE Staff

Photo: CIPE Staff

This year Heritage Foundation ranked Cambodia as 112th or “mostly unfree” in its 2016 Index of Economic Freedom. Though Cambodia’s management of public finances and trade have become notably more open and transparent, deep institutional and systemic challenges remain, in part due to weak property rights, pervasive corruption, and burdensome bureaucracy.

On the upside, Freedom House’s Freedom on the Net Index ranks Cambodia at 48th, partly free in regard to Internet freedom. Where traditional media is rigorously regulated, accessible social media and ICT apps present an opportunity for educating, advocating, and advancing positive reforms in Cambodia and the region more broadly.

CIPE, in tandem with Panoply Digital, a U.K.-based ICT for Development consulting firm, sought to seize this opportunity and advance the work of two partner organizations based in Cambodia. In its second training workshop in a series, CIPE and Panoply Digital presented tools for online research, professional development/open learning, communications, and online training courses to Silaka and the Cambodian Federation of Employers and Business Associations (CAMFEBA).

The tools and strategies outlined in this workshop are detailed in this month’s Economic Reform Feature Service article. In addition, CIPE has created a platform compiling resources for advocacy as well as membership development and services, financial management, and organizational management.

Stephanie Bandyk is a Program Assistant for Global Programs at CIPE.

Democracy that Delivers #25: Medhawi Giri and Stephanie Bandyk on Working in International Development

Guests Stephanie Bandyk (left) and Medhawi Giri.

Guests Stephanie Bandyk (left) and Medhawi Giri.

In this episode of the Democracy that Delivers podcast, CIPE’s Medhawi Giri, Program Assistant for South Asia, and Stephanie Bandyk, Program Assistant for Global Programs, discuss how they got interested in international development, democracy, and economic reform issues, their academic and career backgrounds, and what they’ve learned since working at CIPE.

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Democracy that Delivers #24: Karina Orlova on the Risks Reporters Face in Russia and Why She Had to Leave

Podcast guest Karina Orlova (right) with hosts Ken Jaques (center) and Julie Johnson.

Podcast guest Karina Orlova (right) with hosts Ken Jaques (center) and Julie Johnson.

The American Interest journalist Karina Orlova discusses the risks reporters face in Russia and why she had to leave. Orlova talks about her experience reporting on Russian politics and business, and the powerful forces that exert control over journalists and media outlets in that country.

She also shares fascinating insights into current living conditions in Russia and citizen attitudes towards corruption and governance. Follow Karina’s work at The American Interest or on her Facebook page.

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What Does “Intersectionality” Mean for International Development?

Participants at a Women's Business Network meeting in Nepal in 2014.

Participants at a Women’s Business Network meeting in Nepal in 2014.

By Hanna Pioske

The word “intersectionality” is thrown around a lot these days. Political candidates use intersectional rhetoric in their campaigns, and organization after organization publish reports on the benefits of creating intersectional programming. Everyone seems to be using the term as a buzzword to add legitimacy to their beliefs. But what does intersectionality truly mean, and what lessons can the international development community take away from it?

Intersectional theory originated in academia as a way to explain the dual oppressions African-American women faced from the combined effects of racism and sexism. In 1989, African-American legal scholar Kimberle Crenshaw coined the term intersectionality in her seminal work “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics.”

In the article, Crenshaw compares multiple axes of oppression to a car accident in an intersection. Much as a car in the middle of an intersection can be hit by vehicles coming from any or all directions, an African-American woman can be discriminated against through racism, sexism, or both. Since this first use, the term has expanded beyond the particular struggle of African-American women to include multiple intersections of gender, such as class, disability, religion, and sexual orientation.

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #23: Julie Arostegui on Empowering Women in Post-Conflict Situations

Podcast guest Julie Arostegui.

Podcast guest Julie Arostegui.

Gender and security expert Julie Arostegui discusses the opportunities that arise in post-conflict situations to empower women and increase their role in democratic processes. Arostegui talks about the important role that law plays in creating these opportunities and explains the impact of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325, which mandates women’s participation in peace processes. The discussion also covers the role economic development plays in creating stability post-conflict and how economic empowerment of women often leads to their greater political participation. Arostegui also talks about her involvement in programs to empower women politically in Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Middle East and North Africa.

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Arostegui developed a toolkit on Using Law to Empower Women in Post-Conflict Systems.

Read Arostegui’s articles Gender, conflict, and peace-building: how conflict can catalyse positive change for women and  Gender, Migration and Security: Migration policies must empower women and men.

Visit her LinkedIn page to access other articles she has written and follow her on Twitter at @JulieLArostegui. Her website is jlaconsultingllc.com.