Democracy that Delivers Podcast #39: András Lőke on the State of Democracy in Hungary


Podcast guest Andras Loke

This week on the Democracy that Delivers podcast, President of Transparency International Hungary, András Lőke, discusses the state of democracy in Hungary and the hard work it takes to maintain that system over time. He also discusses the cultural differences between countries in Central Europe and how culture can influence democratic development. Lőke is also founder and editor-in-chief of, a group of websites covering 23 Budapest neighborhoods that receives 800,000 unique visitors a month. He speaks about the  government’s influence on the media. Lőke also talks about how corruption undermines democracy and the “economy within the economy” that institutionalizes corruption in Hungary.

Lőke recently spoke at the conference The Illiberal Turn?: Reasserting Democratic Values in Central and Eastern Europe. The conference was co-hosted by CIPE with the Atlantic Council, the International Republican Institute, the National Democratic Institute, and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. You can conference presentations and panel discussions on the Atlantic Council website.

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Trade Facilitation Helps Developing Countries Get a Leg Up


By Lindsey Klaassen

This piece originally appeared on the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Above the Fold blog

Developing countries tend to experience higher costs to trade and are ill-equipped to navigate through the mire of international border requirements. The World Trade Organization (WTO) established the Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) in part to address this very challenge.

The TFA is unique in several respects, as it was the first multilateral trade agreement set forth by the WTO, and it was intentionally designed to make cross-border trade easier for developing countries. Once fully implemented, it is estimated that the TFA will reduce trade costs by up to 15 percent for developing countries and increase global merchandise exports by up to $1 trillion annually by increasing customs efficiency and cutting red tape that impedes the efficient flow of goods at the border.

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Supporting Women’s Economic Empowerment through Women’s Chambers of Commerce

Women from the Papua New Guinea Women’s Chamber of Commerce and Industry participating in a capacity building workshop

Women from the Papua New Guinea Women’s Chamber of Commerce and Industry participating in a capacity building workshop

Since its creation in 1983, CIPE has been working with business associations, chambers of commerce and economic think tanks around the world to promote institutional reforms and advance economic and political empowerment.

Women business associations are one type of business associations that CIPE has partnered with in order to support the economic empowerment of women. Recognizing the unique role such organizations play, CIPE has focused on strengthening women business associations and thus empowering women to become entrepreneurs and leaders in their local communities and countries.

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #38: The Rapid-Reaction Anti-Corruption Project

Discussion moderator Christian Caryl with panelists Carl Gershman, Sarah Chayes and Eric Hontz at the Rapid Reaction Anti-Corruption Project event on September 16, 2016.

Discussion moderator Christian Caryl with panelists Carl Gershman, Sarah Chayes and Eric Hontz at the Rapid Reaction Anti-Corruption Project event.

On September 16, 2016, CIPE hosted a panel discussion on the need for rapid response in countries where a significant opportunity has appeared for achieving anti-corruption progress. CIPE’s Rapid Reaction Anti-Corruption Project is designed to address this need by deploying a team of anti-corruption experts with international stature to countries in transition. The experts, with NGO, business, and law enforcement backgrounds, would be swiftly deployed to countries which have governments newly empowered to address corruption, and a strong economic interest from foreign firms previously repelled by corruption risk.

Today’s podcast is a recording of the event at which experts discussed corruption challenges and practical solutions. The event was opened by CIPE Managing Director Andrew Wilson [then Executive Director (acting)] and was moderated by Chrstian Caryl, Editor of the Foreign Policy Democracy Lab blog.

Panel speakers included President of the National Endowment for Democracy Carl Gershman;  Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for National Peace Sarah Chayes, and author of Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security Sarah Chayes; and CIPE Program Officer for Ukraine, Russia and Central Asia Eric Hontz.

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Trade Facilitation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership


By Michael Merriam

In recent months, research on global trade has been divided over the effects of a long negotiated trade partnership for twelve Pacific Rim nations. Signed by Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States, and Vietnam, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is, by GDP of signatory nations, the largest free trade pact in the history of the world. With many standards and provisions, the agreement’s depths contain articles that deal with a variety of subjects ranging from intellectual property rights to environmental protection. According to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, there will be 18,000 different taxes on American products that will be reduced or eliminated by adoption of the TPP. Beyond the benefits to the United States, the increased trade promotion and tariff reduction of the TPP promises to advance job creation, good governance, trade competitiveness, and stable economic growth on both sides of the pacific. Most significantly, the TPP incorporates greater trade facilitation requirements than past regional trade pacts, a hopeful sign for the future of global trade.

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #37: Andrea Franzoso on Exposing Corruption in one of Italy’s top Transportation Companies

Podcast guest Andrea Fransozo

Podcast guest Andrea Fransozo

On the Democracy that Delivers podcast this week, Italian whistleblower Andrea Franzoso talks about the difficult decision he made to expose corruption in his company and the impact this had on his personal and professional life. Franzoso discusses how he came across evidence of wrongdoing by the company’s president, the reaction to his revelations internally, and his eventual decision to take his findings to the police. His story is both inspiring and troubling as he shares the professional and personal cost of his decision. The conversation also covers what companies and governments can do to better protect whistleblowers and encourage a culture of accountability and transparency.

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #36: Democracy and Governance: Key Foundations to Sustainable Development

Discussion moderator Andrew Wilson (far left) with panelists Alicia Phillips Mandaville, Chris Maloney, and Beth Tritter.

Discussion moderator Andrew Wilson (far left) with panelists Alicia Phillips Mandaville, Chris Maloney, and Beth Tritter.

This week’s podcast is a recording of an event CIPE co-hosted on September 15th with Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) in recognition of the International Day of Democracy. Following each of its quarterly Board of Directors meetings, MCC works with other partners to convene conversations of importance to the development community. This event provided a brief update of the recent MCC Board Meeting, and brought together thought leaders to discuss the role of democracy in development.

Sustainable development and reducing poverty are primary objectives of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Panelists demonstrated how the SDG goals that pertain to democratic governance are vital to reducing poverty, creating jobs, boosting economic growth, and making sure that development is sustainable. They discussed how strong democratic institutions, a robust rule of law, and inclusive economic policies that create a level playing field for everyone are essential elements of a development agenda with lasting impact. The discussion was moderated by CIPE Managing Director [then Executive Director (acting)] Andrew Wilson.

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