Will Argentina’s First-Ever Presidential Debate Help Change Politics for the Better?

Candidates at the October 4 debate, with an empty podium for incumbent Daniel Scioli, who dropped out of the debate. (Photo: AP)

Candidates at the October 4 debate, with an empty podium for incumbent Daniel Scioli, who dropped out of the debate. (Photo: AP)

When the lights went down and the countdown to going live on the air began, everyone in the room knew they were witnessing history — the first ever debate among presidential candidates in Argentina.

It was a long, hard negotiation process that brought the candidates to the debate table. The debate was not without its flaws. The biggest of course was the decision of the leading candidate, Daniel Scioli, representing the current governing party (the Front for Victory), to not attend even after participating in all the negotiations leading up to the debate. Still, the room was electric and the audience complied with all the rules they were asked to abide by, including refraining from clapping or cheering for their favorite candidate.

The five candidates who did participate (Mauricio Macri, Sergio Massa, Margaret Stolbizer, Adolfo Rodriguez Saá and Nicolás del Caño) took advantage of the empty lectern representing the missing candidate, faulting him for disrespecting them and the people of Argentina by his failure to show up.

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Reports Show Weak Progress on Economic Reform in Pakistan

The World Economic Forum lists a weak judiciary as one of the issues holding back economic reform in Pakistan. (Photo: Pakistan Today)

The World Economic Forum lists a weakening judiciary as one of the issues holding back economic reform in Pakistan. (Photo: Pakistan Today)

In Pakistan, the process of economic reforms has been painfully slow – a fact underlined by stalled or slipping progress on several international indices. On the World Bank’s 2015 Doing Business, Pakistan fell from 107th out of 185 countries to 128th. The World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Index brought Pakistan down to 129th in 2014-15 from 124th in 2012-13. And the Fraser’s Institute report kept Pakistan at 124th out of 167 countries — the same spot it earned in 2013.

The World Economic Forum published its Global Competitiveness report this week, showing similarly weak progress. Three large South Asia Countries were ranked – India at 55th, Bangladesh at 107th and Pakistan at 126th. As compared to the last report, India jumped 16 places, Bangladesh by 5 and Pakistan slipped by one.

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Helping Diaspora Investors Make a Difference in their Home Countries

A money transfer service where people can receive remittances in Hong Kong. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

A shop in Hong Kong where people can receive money sent from abroad. Remittances accounted for more than 80 percent of foreign investment into mainland China from 1979 to 1995. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

“There is nothing more powerful than individuals motivated to invest in meaningful programs in their home countries,” said Eric-Vincent Guichard, the Founder and CEO of Homestrings, an online platform facilitating global diaspora investments.  The son of a Guinean father and an American mother, Eric spent most of his formative years in Guinea attending primary and secondary school before moving to the United States. From his personal experience, he knows the challenges that diaspora communities face when trying to invest in their country of origin.

Remittances comprise a significant portion of the foreign directed investment (FDI) in many countries. According to the World Bank, global remittances consistently dwarf foreign assistance by a factor of three, with $414 billion projected this year alone.  Even in countries that attract a lot of investment from global markets, the role of diaspora investment is substantial: between 1991 and 2001, the Indian diaspora was responsible for $2.8 billion of the $10 billion in foreign investment the flowed into the country. In China, diaspora investment accounted for the vast majority — 80 percent — of total FDI between 1979 and 1995.

Remittances have come to play this vital role as source of FDI despite various rules and regulations that make it difficult for individuals to invest in private companies back home. Traditionally, diaspora remittances have flowed mostly to family members, religious institutions, and non-governmental organizations.

These channels are invaluable when it comes to supporting charitable causes and small family businesses, but do not give investors much control over how the money is used or provide the opportunity to re-invest or make a profit. This significantly limits the potential of diaspora investment to develop larger, more productive businesses that can create jobs and economic growth back home.

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Fighting Corruption Matters for Indonesia’s Oil and Gas Industry


“If a company’s goal is to stay in business for a long time, why take the shortcut and pay bribes, which can damage the company in the long term?” asked Sammy Hamzah, president of Indonesian Petroleum Association, at the launch event of CIPE and International Business Links (IBL)’s new Anti-Corruption Compliance guidebook for mid-sized companies in Indonesia’s oil and gas industry.

“When a company commits a corrupt behavior, it takes on average 20 to 30 years to bring back the company’s credibility.”

Corruption is a major problem in Indonesia. According to a Gallup poll, more than 8 in 10 Indonesians say that corruption is widespread throughout the nation’s government and businesses. The oil and gas sector is particularly susceptible to corruption because of the multiple steps in the procurement and licensing processes, as well as the sheer amount of the money involved.

That’s why CIPE and IBL produced the guide. It’s intended to help mid-sized companies looking to become suppliers of local or international oil and gas companies to understand the business case for anti-corruption compliance and instruct them on how to create an internal compliance system.

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Meet the 2015 Global Photo Competition Winners


Joseph Balikuddembe, Uganda

Joseph Balikuddembe is a web application developer from Uganda. “[My] background and passion for fine arts manifested in my desire and love for photography, a passion am trying to grow as an amateur photographer. I take pictures mainly with my phone as I go about my day,” Balikuddembe said.

“When I met Jackie, the lady in the picture, it was at a mentorship expo organized with select youth entrepreneurs who were doing activities that they could share stories with those at the expo to learn how they made it and to impart skills that would empower youths to better their lives through skills development and for democratic empowerment, for which she was one of the mentors.

This was one of the pictures I took of her at her stall. I loved the way she was tutoring people to design clothes and clothes artifacts from scrap materials and from scrap clothes. Her display was one of the most popular. I took the picture with a hope that one day I will be able to tell her story, or the little I know of it.”

Meagan Moses, Texas, USA

Meagan Moses, Texas, USA

Meagan Moses is a third year student at the University of Texas, pursuing a degree in studio art with a certificate in innovation, entrepreneurship, and creativity.  “My family includes several entrepreneurs and I have always been encouraged to work hard, set high goals, and to not let anything get in the way of obtaining those goals,” she said.

“My photo is of Lungile, a South Africa woman living in the township Imizamo Yethu. When visiting the Cape Town Township, I was in awe of the conditions in which these people lived.  Forced to do all that they can to earn a living, many people in this community are left with no option other than being entrepreneurial. Lungile worked out of an abandoned shack home stringing beads to create beauty wear for women within the township, and hopes of selling them as souvenirs to their visitors.”


Daniel Eguren, Venezuela

Daniel Eguren is a fine art photographer and filmmaker in Barquisimeto, Venezuela whose work has been recognized at a number of regional and international festivals. He also works on entrepreneurship and youth empowerment projects.

“My photo represents my personal journey from elementary school to the person I am today, a dreamer with a lot of ideas in mind, an entrepreneur, and a leader. Education is crucial to help and empower kids to find the right direction and to develop the skills of what they want to become when they grow up.

As far as I’m concerned teachers don’t really focus on developing kids skills so kids waste their ‘entrepreneurial spirit.’ If that’s the case, I think teachers have to focus more on that. I’m a believer that entrepreneurship and creating a company is not about personal benefit but it is for the community benefits, to service people needs and to contribute to the progress of the world. “

Thanks to the more than 100 photographers who entered the competition and to the hundreds who voted online for the winners! Each winner will receive a $250 USD honorarium for their photo.

What’s the Role of the Private Sector in Democracy and Development?


Today is the International Day of Democracy, when the world celebrates the importance of democracy and democratic governance. But the role of the private sector in building democracies that deliver prosperity and opportunity to all citizens is often overlooked. That is why the contribution made by private sector participants at the 8th Ministerial Conference of the Community of Democracies (COD) is particularly noteworthy.

The Community of Democracies was founded in 2000 as an intergovernmental coalition specifically focused on promoting democracy and democratic ideals (at the time, only 68 of 189 UN member states were democracies; today the number has risen to 84). This year’s Ministerial, which took place on July 22-24 in El Salvador, gathered representatives of civil societyparliamentsthe private sector, and youth in the capital of San Salvador. The leading theme for El Salvador’s 2013-2015 presidency of the organization was “Democracy and Development.” About 800 participants from more than 70 countries attended.

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Kenya’s Renewed Commitment to Fight Corruption Needs the Private Sector


This post originally appeared on the Corporate Compliance Trends blog.

When I visited Nairobi a few weeks ago, the signs of President Obama’s recent visit to attend the Global Entrepreneurship Summit were still clearly visible all around – from welcome posters to the spruced-up cityscape. I was in Kenya to work with CIPE’s partner organization, Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM), on a training-of-trainers workshop devoted to anti-corruption compliance and practical ways in which mid-sized companies in particular can implement robust compliance programs. The topic is quite timely.

Corruption remains a key problems in Kenya, affecting both the country’s democratic and economic development prospects. It was one of the leading issued discussed during President Obama’s visit, which resulted in an agreement signed between the Kenyan government and the U.S. to introduce new anti-graft measures. The 29-point deal stipulates, among other things, that Kenya will step up investigations into corruption cases, increased U.S. assistance and advice to Kenyan anti-corruption agencies and advice on relevant legislation, and international commitments by Kenya to join the Egmont Group of Financial Intelligence Units and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI).

At the same time, profound challenges persist. Within days of Obama’s visit, Kenya’s Office of the Auditor-General released a troubling report that brought to light some uncomfortable numbers. According to the report, only 26% of money spent and collected by the government has been fully approved in an audit for 2013-2014. The health department alone failed to account for 22 billion Kenyan shillings ($216 million) worth of spending. What is more, over 12,000 false names were discovered on the government payroll.

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