Tag Archives: youth

Meet the 2015 Global Photo Competition Winners


Joseph Balikuddembe, Uganda

Joseph Balikuddembe is a web application developer from Uganda. “[My] background and passion for fine arts manifested in my desire and love for photography, a passion am trying to grow as an amateur photographer. I take pictures mainly with my phone as I go about my day,” Balikuddembe said.

“When I met Jackie, the lady in the picture, it was at a mentorship expo organized with select youth entrepreneurs who were doing activities that they could share stories with those at the expo to learn how they made it and to impart skills that would empower youths to better their lives through skills development and for democratic empowerment, for which she was one of the mentors.

This was one of the pictures I took of her at her stall. I loved the way she was tutoring people to design clothes and clothes artifacts from scrap materials and from scrap clothes. Her display was one of the most popular. I took the picture with a hope that one day I will be able to tell her story, or the little I know of it.”

Meagan Moses, Texas, USA

Meagan Moses, Texas, USA

Meagan Moses is a third year student at the University of Texas, pursuing a degree in studio art with a certificate in innovation, entrepreneurship, and creativity.  “My family includes several entrepreneurs and I have always been encouraged to work hard, set high goals, and to not let anything get in the way of obtaining those goals,” she said.

“My photo is of Lungile, a South Africa woman living in the township Imizamo Yethu. When visiting the Cape Town Township, I was in awe of the conditions in which these people lived.  Forced to do all that they can to earn a living, many people in this community are left with no option other than being entrepreneurial. Lungile worked out of an abandoned shack home stringing beads to create beauty wear for women within the township, and hopes of selling them as souvenirs to their visitors.”


Daniel Eguren, Venezuela

Daniel Eguren is a fine art photographer and filmmaker in Barquisimeto, Venezuela whose work has been recognized at a number of regional and international festivals. He also works on entrepreneurship and youth empowerment projects.

“My photo represents my personal journey from elementary school to the person I am today, a dreamer with a lot of ideas in mind, an entrepreneur, and a leader. Education is crucial to help and empower kids to find the right direction and to develop the skills of what they want to become when they grow up.

As far as I’m concerned teachers don’t really focus on developing kids skills so kids waste their ‘entrepreneurial spirit.’ If that’s the case, I think teachers have to focus more on that. I’m a believer that entrepreneurship and creating a company is not about personal benefit but it is for the community benefits, to service people needs and to contribute to the progress of the world. “

Thanks to the more than 100 photographers who entered the competition and to the hundreds who voted online for the winners! Each winner will receive a $250 USD honorarium for their photo.

International Youth Day 2015: From the CIPE Fellows

CIPE firmly believes in this year’s International Youth Day theme: youth civic engagement. Without young people’s political, economic, and social participation, no community is truly democratic. And many youth around the world have great ideas that can transform societies for better, but simply lack the platform to speak up. That’s why CIPE youth programs have helped empower youth to be heard.

This month’s Feature Service article highlights the work of four reformers from the recent CIPE-Atlas Corps Think Tank LINKS program – Bahaa Eddin Al-Dahoudi, Hiba Safi, Huma Sattar, and Lawrence Yealue. Their articulate stance on their country’s political, economic, and social issues highlight how youth are helping strengthen democracies around the world.

Read their articles here.

Defining Syria’s Future

Creating a Brighter Future for Syrian Youth from CIPE on Vimeo.

This International Youth Day, Syrian youth face a bleak situation. During more than four years of conflict in their country, more than 12,000 children have been killed. Approximately 2 million are living as refugees, and 7.5 million are in need of humanitarian aid.

Syria now has one of the lowest education rates in the world. A 2015 Save the Children report estimates that 2.8 million Syrian children are not attending school and a quarter of school buildings have been damaged or destroyed. Many youth must forego education and work to help their families survive. Yet what often gets lost in this picture is the resilience shown by many young Syrians and their determination to play a role in building a better Syria.

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Guatemalan Youth Fed Up with Spectating Become Protagonists in their Country’s Future

Presentaci+¦n de Colectivo en UVG

By Dara Sanford

In the past few months, Guatemala has been hit by a wave of protests aimed at the government, focusing primarily on corruption endemic in the country. Thousands of Guatemalans, a majority of whom are Millennials, have taken to the streets to show they are fed up with corruption and that they want their government to do more in terms of responding to their needs.

One organization working on helping the Guatemalan youth demand more from the government through protests and various other channels is Cincoen5 (Five in 5). Cincoen5 is a collective of six organizations that work together to improve development in Guatemala focusing on five key areas: education, security, nutrition, infrastructure, and employment. The collective has a specific interest in helping youth become more politically active.

Since its creation in 2013, Cincoen5 has created and shared a long-term development plan for Guatemala, held multiple meetings around the country, including universities, and has remained an active participant in social mobilizations.

In this interview, we had the opportunity to talk to Walter Corzo, whose organization Jovenes Contra la Violencia (Youth Against Violence) is a member of the collective, about the current situation youth in Guatemala are facing, the work of Cincoen5, and what the collective is planning for the future.

Q: First, what are some of the challenges the youth in Guatemala are facing right now and how can increased participation in the political process help alleviate some of these challenges?

A: There is a big call for change. This is because the young people don’t see their needs being acknowledged by the government. What we are doing right now is putting a lot of pressure on the system, but government is resistant to making changes. In Guatemala, 50 percent of people live in poverty, and that is a huge problem.

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Protest Movement Electrifies Armenian Civil Society

(Photo: BBC)

(Photo: BBC)

By Ann Mette Sander Nielsen

The Electric Yerevan protests began on June 19, when protesters gathered on the street to express their discontent with the local power company, the Electric Networks of Armenia (ENA) and its planned 14 percent increase in electricity tariffs from August, the third price raise within the past two years, which would result in a more than 60 percent overall increase in electricity tariffs.

Public discontent was further aggravated by a report revealing evidence of gross corruption and mismanagement at the utility. The report exposed the extravagant lifestyle of the ENA management and revealed that the ENA has accumulated debt by overpaying suppliers and contractors.

On June 23, four days after the start of the protests, roughly 2,000 protesters gathered on Baghramyan Avenue to express their grievances with the ENA management. They were blocked by police forces, and in response the protesters sat down and spent the night there. They were forcibly dispersed by police water cannons and around 250 people were detained.

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The Future of a Nation: A One Minute Look at Lebanon

"Corniche beirut" by Varun Shiv Kapur from Berkeley, United States - Corniche. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Corniche beirut” by Varun Shiv Kapur from Berkeley, United States – Corniche. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

By Elie Obeid

Lebanon, it’s that country in the Middle East that you sometimes miss while going through a map. Despite its small size, Lebanon enjoyed quite a reputation in the 1960s and early 1970s as being the Switzerland of the Middle East, and Beirut, its capital, was known as the Paris of the Middle East due to the number of tourists it attracted and its role as a financial and trade hub for the region.

In recent years, however, Lebanon has been suffering from various social, political, economic problems. To discuss all these issues and possible solutions for them would require volumes so we’ll stick to economics this time with a little twist of politics. But before getting into that, how about we take a look at the numbers first.

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Mentorship Helps Women Entrepreneurs in Nicaragua Grow their Businesses


“When women come together in Nicaragua, we usually talk about families and communities. We never discuss about our businesses. That’s why a community like Red de Empresarias de Nicaragua (REN) is important, where women are encouraged to talk about their businesses without offending someone or thinking it’s a taboo.”

Marla Reyes Rojas, the owner of Techno Commerce Group, told me this over a cup of coffee during my recent trip to Managua. I was glad to hear first-hand how a CIPE partner is fostering a community where businesswomen, like Marla, can openly talk and build networks with other women in business.

Micro, Small, and Medium Enterprise (MSME) growth has been touted as a key for Nicaragua’s economic growth, but the country remains one of the most difficult places to start a business in Central America (for example, the licensing process takes more than 200 days to complete).  This is even more pronounced for women entrepreneurs who confront myriad of challenges, and as a result only represent around 25 percent of the MSME sector in the country. Additionally, women face the rooted machismo culture that prevents them from achieving gender equality in the economy.

In such an environment, it’s crucial for women in business to come together and motivate one another. That’s why for the past year, REN led a mentorship program to develop leadership and entrepreneurship skills among women in Nicaragua. The program linked successful women entrepreneurs to female university students with business degrees (who served as interns) and emerging women micro-entrepreneurs (who were the mentees). REN matched ten teams — a team consisted of a mentee, mentor, and an intern — and each group worked to improve the mentee’s business.

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