Tag Archives: Philippines

Associations Must Innovate to Survive Digital Disruption

OBP Profile pic (hi-res)By Octavio Peralta

Digital disruption is turning the world on its head, and presenting opportunities as well as threats, to associations, chambers, societies, non-profits, and other membership organizations. As relationships develop online and social media opens up new ways to be part of many communities, many associations are faced with the prospect of having a less tightly-bound group or worse, losing their membership. On the other hand, greater connectivity leads to new models of membership and network collaborations.

The Philippine Council of Associations and Association Executives (PCAAE) www.pcaae.org will tackle this burning issue and other related topics designed to share association professionals’ and experts’ insights in creating innovative ways to deal with shifts in the digital age.

With the theme “Race to Innovation: Winning in the Age of Disruption,” the PCAAE Associations Summit 4 (AS4) is expected to draw about 200 association professionals here and abroad. The two-day summit is slated for November 23 to 24, 2016 at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC) in Manila, and will feature local and international speakers who will share best practices in association and membership organization governance, leadership and management.

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Association Executives Strengthen Their Profession in the Philippines

PCAAE presented its 1st ‘Ang Susi’ Awards on December 3, 2015 at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC) during the gala dinner and awards night of the 3rd Association Executives Summit.

PCAAE presented its 1st ‘Ang Susi’ Awards on December 3, 2015 at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC) during the gala dinner and awards night of the 3rd Association Executives Summit.

By Octavio “Bobby” Peralta

The Philippine Council for the Advancement of Association Executives (PCAAE)* was created in 2013 to facilitate the work of association executives in managing their organizations, and to advance their profession through knowledge delivery, recognition and collaboration initiatives. The PCAAE is the only platform in the Philippines that puts associations and other membership organizations such as chambers, societies, foundations, cooperatives and the non-profit sector at large under one umbrella.

Last December, PCAAE held its annual flagship event, the Third Association Executives’ Summit (AES3), in Manila gathering association professionals, managers, and leaders. The Summit focused mainly on membership-management and governance issues under the theme “Compass to Excellence” and drew 120 delegates to the Philippine International Convention Center, an impressive turnout considering how many Philippine associations’ event calendars were disrupted by the nation’s hosting of APEC 2015.

For the first time, aside from the learning tracks, a table-top exhibition on association services was concurrently held as were the “Ang Susi Awards” that recognized the achievements and contributions of associations in national sustainable development.

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Improving Local Level Governance in the Philippines

The Philippine National Police have used the Performance Governance System to improve governance.

Efficient, transparent and accountable governance continues to be a major driving force behind reform movements around the world. In partnership with the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE), the Institute for Solidarity in Asia (ISA) has implemented the Performance Governance System (PGS) initiative in the Philippines. The Performance Governance System is a highly rigorous accreditation program that requires participating organizations to reform and strengthen their governance practices with the goal of improving organizational performance, financial transparency and political accountability.

The recently published case study from Strategies for Policy Reform describes the Performance Governance System in detail. ISA has subsequently shared three case studies that illustrate how the adoption of the Performance Governance system has improved public governance in Talisay city, the Philippine National Police, and the Philippine Army.

Teodora Mihaylova is Research Coordinator at CIPE.

Developing the Association Executive Profession: The PCAAE Experience

pcaae

By Octavio B. Peralta, Founding Chairman, PCAAE

During the launch event of the Philippine Council for the Advancement of Association Executives (PCAAE) in Manila on November 20, 2013 which I presided, I asked the over 200 attending delegates by show of hands who among them use the title, “Association Executive” when filling up the space for profession in official forms and documents. Only one did!

The Association Executive (AE) profession in North America and Europe is widely-known and well-recognized but unfortunately not in many developing countries, including in Asia and the Pacific, with the exception of developed Australia and New Zealand. This also true in my country, the Philippines, where my organization, the Association of Development Financing in Asia and the Pacific (ADFIAP), is headquartered.

I have been an AE for over 23 years now (and counting) and did not have the benefit of a formal education on association management, which was non-existent in my country. I did learn somehow to cope by learning on the job and it helped that I joined the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE).

My own experience, and what I have witnessed in associations that have struggled to stay relevant and sustainable, have led me to found, with a few colleagues, the Philippine Council for the Advancement of Association Executives (PCAAE).

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Achieving Inclusive Growth

By Dan Erwin Bagaporo, 2013 CIPE Blog Competition Winner. Read the other winning blogs here.

The Philippines has one of the fastest growing economies in the world, recently registering 6.6 percent GDP growth (second highest in Asia). However, few Filipinos experience its benefits, as 76 percent of this growth went to the richest 40 families in the country. While the government is doing its best to promote “inclusive growth,” 26 percent of Filipinos still live on less than $1 a day. As large companies swallow up wealth, many Filipinos are left out, especially the indigent, young, and elderly, who find securing employment difficult. A few years ago, I witnessed this tragic reality firsthand.

My friends and I went to visit an old retirement home for abandoned senior citizens. We were set to conduct interviews with residents for my friends’ thesis about geriatric loneliness. It turned out, loneliness was the least of their problems. Going around the compound, we saw that it was very ill-maintained. Corridors and rooms were dirty, and pungent. The retirement home was clearly understaffed and lacked necessary funding to maintain an acceptable standard of living for its residents.

After we left, I did some research and discovered that the retirement home has constantly been the recipient of numerous social programs, from food distribution to privately-sponsored Christmas parties. I also found that many other public retirement homes experienced the same situation. My question was: despite all of the largesse, why was the quality of life of residents in these retirement homes still poor? I must admit; it took me a while to answer this question.

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Dr. Jesus Estanislao on the Recipe for Successful Reforms

It took years of patient effort to consolidate democracy after the Philippines' People Power Movement toppled the Marcos regime in 1986.

It took years of patient effort to consolidate democracy after the Philippines’ People Power Movement toppled the Marcos regime in 1986.

Democratization and the desire for a free market economy continue to be major driving forces behind reform movements around the world. In recent years, we have witnessed millions of people rising up for meaningful political and economic reforms, especially in the Middle East region. Genuine democracy, however, calls for more essential ingredients in its recipe for success and sustainability — namely good governance and responsible citizenship.

Dr. Jesus Estanislao, Chairman of the Institute for Solidarity in Asia and of the Institute of Corporate Directors, is one of the leading advocates for good governance and for responsible citizenship. He observes a crucial connection that reformers must comprehend— “Economic and political freedoms belong to the essence of a genuine democracy.”

In his recent interview with CIPE, now published as an Economic Reform Feature Service article, Dr. Estanislao shares his personal experiences in strengthening democracy through market-oriented reform. He reveals several factors that contribute to successful and meaningful reforms by providing readers with his first-hand knowledge of good governance advocacy and reform — factors that will benefit current and future reformers.

Read the whole article here.

Politics – a Family Business?

President Benigno Aquino III with "Team PNoy" candidates (Photo: Yahoo)

President Benigno Aquino III with “Team PNoy” candidates (Photo: Yahoo)

The recent mid-term elections in the Philippines brought both change and continuity. At stake were 12 of the 24 senate seats, 229 district seats in the House of Representatives, and more than 18,000 local posts, including mayors and governors. President Benigno S. Aquino III and his political allies, Team PNoy, gained important wins, notably in the Senate. This augurs well for the advancement of the President’s anti-corruption and economic growth program of the “straight path” or “tuwid na daan.” Many credit these policies for the March upgrade of the country’s sovereign borrower rating to an investment grade by Fitch for the first time in history. But is the top-level commitment to make government more effective through good governance and economic reforms enough to affect change on the ground? The peculiar kind of continuity in Philippine politics poses that question.

The election results indicate that, as in the past, the biggest winners were the political dynasties and their often questionable tactics involving “guns, goons, gold, and glitter” to mobilize voters. There were, however, some significant upsets by candidates who ran on a good governance platform and won against entrenched political dynasties. Leni Robredo’s win of the congressional seat in Naga City ended the 35 year reign of the Villafuertes family, and Rolen Paulino’s mayoral win against Anne Marie Gordon in Olongapo City ended the quarter-century rule of the Gordon family. But many other dynasties still continue to dominate.

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