Tag Archives: institutions

It’s Time for Reform in Egypt

via Wikimedia Commons

via Wikimedia Commons

This blog originally appeared in Arabic on CIPE-Arabia.org

Egypt is currently undergoing a critical moment due to its failure to adequately deal with over 40 years of accumulated economic problems. And yet, according to various reports, including the CitiBank report in 2010, Egypt has the potential to be one of the biggest economies in the world.

The Egyptian economy’s state is challenging because we have few alternatives other than the current economic reforms but if they are implemented poorly, they will negatively impact everyone; the rich, poor, and middle class. However, if these reforms are implemented well, they could deliver for all Egyptian citizens in both the medium and long term.

Therefore, the key question is: is there any better alternative than working on the agreement with the IMF? The answer is, “no.”

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A Seat in the Limousine

From Left: CIPE Chair Greg Lebedev, with discussion moderator Andrew Wilson, and speakers Alicia Phillips Mandaville, Chris Maloney, and Beth Tritter at the Democracy and Governance event on September 15, 2016.

From Left: CIPE Chair Greg Lebedev, with discussion moderator Andrew Wilson, and speakers Alicia Phillips Mandaville, Chris Maloney, and Beth Tritter at the Democracy and Governance event on September 15, 2016.

Democratic governance and development go hand in hand. Transparency and the rule of law provided by well-functioning democracies create favorable business environments where firms of all sectors and sizes can thrive. In turn, inclusive economic growth lifts populations out of poverty and strengthens public expectations of accountability. To celebrate the International Day of Democracy, CIPE and the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) held a joint event on September 15, titled “Democracy and Governance: Key Foundations to Sustainable Development.”

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #32: Gina Chon on Economic News from Around the World

Podcast guest Gina Chon (left) with hosts Julie Johnson and Ken Jaques.

Podcast guest Gina Chon (left) with hosts Julie Johnson and Ken Jaques.

On the Democracy That Delivers podcast this week, Thomson Reuters Breakingviews correspondent Gina Chon talks about reporting on economic news from around the world. Chon discusses the challenges journalists face in countries where gaining access to accurate economic information is difficult and where authoritarian governments attempt to control the news on the economy. Chon also talks about how she became a journalist, her experiences working overseas, and what excites her about the way journalism is evolving today.

Follow Gina on Twitter at @GinaChon.

Also, watch a video of Chon participating as a panelist at a CIPE event on The State of Journalism Globally: How Authoritarian Regimes Control Information.

Democracy that Delivers Podcast #31: Kim Holmes Reflects on Democratic Development and the Evolution of American Political Thought

Guest Dr. Kim Holmes (center) with hosts Jennifer Anderson and Ken Jaques.

Guest Dr. Kim Holmes (center) with hosts Jennifer Anderson and Ken Jaques.

Dr. Kim Holmes, who recently returned to the CIPE Board of Directors after a 15 year hiatus, discusses how his views on democratic and economic development have evolved through the years. Holmes discusses specifically how his views on the role of economic development in conflict zones has changed and why. He also talks at length about his new book, The Closing of the Liberal Mind: How Groupthink and Intolerance Define the Left. This podcast is co-hosted by CIPE’s Communications Director Ken Jaques and Program Officer for South Asia Jennifer Anderson

 Learn more about Dr. Holmes and his work.

Disclaimer: The CIPE  Democracy That Delivers podcast encourages guests to freely discuss their experiences, ideas, and opinions. The views expressed by guests are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE).

Rebuilding Amidst Conflict, from Kosovo to Syria

Syrian Economic Forum students learning civic education in Syria.

Syrian Economic Forum students learning civic education in Syria.

The Syrian Economic Forum (SEF), an innovative think tank dedicated to strengthening the Syrian economy and promoting democratic and sustainable development is faced with an extraordinary challenge ahead. With nearly 5 million Syrian refugees and 6.6 million internally displaced persons, SEF must operate in an increasingly uncertain and volatile landscape, amidst a war that has ravaged the country and impaired both political and economic institutions. To rebuild Syrian society and empower a new generation that has suffered the consequences of war, SEF (based out of Gazientep, Turkey) has embarked on a campaign to create a new educational model focused on entrepreneurship, leadership, and civic engagement. This new model involves training and equipping youth with the knowledge and skills to be productive citizens and to re-imagine what it means to be a Syrian citizen. SEF has succeeded in becoming a leading voice for the Syrian private sector, even though managing a think tank amidst widespread conflict is a difficult task.

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Remembering Ronald Coase’s Legacy: Remarks by Oliver Williamson

403px-Coase

As the Economist once chided, “the economics profession was slow to recognize Ronald Coase’s genius. He first expounded his thinking about the firm in a lecture in Dundee in 1932, when he was just 21 years old. Nobody much listened. He published ‘The Nature of the Firm’ five years later. It went largely unread.” Today Coase is revered as a leader in the field of New Institutional Economics (NIE) and a pioneer in exploring transaction cost,  a concept that transformed the field of economics.

This month’s Economic Reform Feature Service article draws from remarks by Nobel Laureate Oliver Williamson at “The Next Generation of Discovery: Research and Policy Change Inspired by Ronald Coase,” a celebration of Coase’s and relevant theorists’ work co-hosted by CIPE and the Ronald Coase Institute.

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Kenneth Arrow: Directions of Research in the Coasean Tradition

Marginal Revolution blogger and George Mason University Professor Tyler Cowen moderates a panel on the future of economic research, featuring Nobel laureate Kenneth Arrow.

Marginal Revolution blogger and George Mason University Professor Tyler Cowen moderates a panel on the future of economic research, featuring Nobel laureate Kenneth Arrow.

Last year, CIPE and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce partnered with the Ronald Coase Institute to host a conference that celebrated the legacy of Ronald Coase and review research inspired by his work. Ronald Coase is perhaps best known for his explanation of the importance of transaction costs, property rights, and institutions to the functioning of an economy. A primary thought leader for new institutional economics, he received the Alfred Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1991.

To recognize the anniversary of the conference, “The Next Generation of Discovery: Research and Policy Change Inspired by Ronald Coase,” CIPE focused this month’s Economic Reform Feature Service article on remarks given by Nobel Laureate and Professor of Economics Emeritus at Stanford University Kenneth Arrow.

To quote Arrow in his opening remarks, Ronald Coase’s work was “provocative, so undriven by fads.” In taking his own independent course, Coase challenged assumptions and norms, and left behind a wealth of insights that continue to influence today’s economic research agenda in a range of fields.

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