Tag Archives: entrepreneurship

Assessing the Business Environment and Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in Egypt and Tunisia

Members of Tunisia's business community share their concerns at a March 2014 policy roundtable.

Members of Tunisia’s business community share their concerns at a March 2014 policy roundtable.

We know that North African economies urgently need economic reforms, opportunities for youth, and greater economic inclusion. But what do we know about where the opportunities lie and – just as important – what are the greatest barriers that obstruct the growth of businesses?

A few salient insights emerged from a recent survey of 131 Egyptian and 100 Tunisian entrepreneurs and business owners, which was conducted by the Center on Development, Democracy, and the Rule of Law at Stanford in cooperation with CIPE. Many of the findings will come as no surprise — the business environment and entrepreneurial ecosystems have room to improve in both countries, and political uncertainty puts a drag on business. One major, policy-relevant finding is the need to address disparities in access to opportunity.

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Youth Entrepreneurship at CIPE

youth-entrepreneurship

Youth play a vital role in shaping the future of every country in the world and yet they are often excluded from the economic and political decision-making process.  For those countries in the world that are striving for democracy based on market-oriented reforms, young people must play an active role as youth entrepreneurs expand opportunities, unleash individual initiative and help to cultivate individual citizens who have a stake in society and democratic governance.

CIPE recognizes the important role youth play in fostering democracy and the free market in developing countries.  As a result, CIPE focuses on building skills through entrepreneurship and management programs and supporting chambers of commerce and business associations that provide networking, services, and forums for young leaders.

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Focus on Youth Entrepreneurship in Peru and Nepal

CIPE recently published two new case studies on youth entrepreneurship programs in Peru and Nepal. Learn more about the dynamic young entrepreneurs who make these programs a success below.

Anil Parajuli

Nepal

parajuliAnil Parajuli attended the 11th Arthalaya program in early 2011 when he was pursuing his Bachelor’s in Development studies. After attending Arthalaya, he started a honey farm named “The Busy Bee” in a suburban town south of Kathmandu. He produces organic honey and sells it to selected clientele in Kathmandu. Anil says “It was Arthalaya that taught me it is important to get started and any small exchange that is based on voluntary exchange and value addition is a big contribution to the overall development of a society.” Arthalaya inspired him to continue his education in entrepreneurship by pursuing a MBA in Entrepreneurship at Kings College. He plans to open a resort near his honey farm once he graduates.

Antonella Romero Jimenez

Ica, Peru

EmprendeAhora ignited the entrepreneurial spark in Antonella Romero Jimenez when she was a participant in 2010. Hailing from the Ica region of Peru, Antonella had not previously given much thought to starting her own business, claiming that in her region “there had never been a program that promoted entrepreneurship among youth.” During the EmprendeAhora educational program, Antonella learned how to create her own business plan and afterward decided to open two cafes called “Káva – Café Peruano” at two universities in the Ica region. Antonella understands the impact entrepreneurship has on her country, saying “it fosters economic development and generates employment for myself and others in my region. Káva itself provides jobs for 12 people – all young women between the ages of 19 and 22.

kava

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One Woman’s Leadership Journey

On April 7, 2012, entrepreneur and longtime women’s right activist Joyce Banda became Malawi’s first female president – and only second on the African continent – after the sudden death of President Bingu wa Mutharika propelled her from the vice presidency to the country’s highest office. In 2014, she placed 40th on the Forbes list of 100 Women Who Lead the World.

What path led her to that meteoric rise and how did she manage to capitalize on her strengths as a woman leader to both overcome personal challenges and face the challenges in front of her country? Last week I had the pleasure of sitting down with Dr. Banda for a candid interview where she talked about her story and its lessons for aspiring women leaders in Africa and around the world.

Before entering politics in 1999 to run for Parliament, Banda started a number of successful businesses and in 1990 founded the National Association of Business Women (NABW). With CIPE support, the organization grew to more than 15,000 members and made an important difference in the lives of women entrepreneurs in Malawi.

What inspired her to become active in business and then in politics? “In 1981, I walked out on an abusive marriage and looking back it became very clear to me that what had gone wrong is that I hadn’t been economically empowered. So I decided to set myself on a path that would ensure that abuse doesn’t happen again,” she said.

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Broadband Internet Access and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean

internet_peru

By Gustavo Guerrero

While broadband internet has become an essential business tool, it has been slow to arrive in the areas that need the benefits of development the most – namely rural regions of developing countries. Though there has been some growth over the years, there is still a long way to go. Recognizing this, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) released a report showing the effect of broadband internet on the economies of Latin American and Caribbean countries, outlining how countries can improve their telecommunications infrastructure.

Nationwide high-speed internet access is something that many in the developed world take for granted. However, in the developing world there is a different story. In Nigeria, low broadband penetration has been cited as hindering the development of e-commerce in Africa’s largest economy. Similar examples are present all across the developing world.  The potential for growth is there, waiting, but it cannot be realized until broadband penetration and speed are improved.

Having a web presence is now almost a prerequisite for becoming a successful business.  The specific type of web presence can range from simply listing basic business contact information and operating hours, to having an online sales portal. Being online offers many benefits with very few, if any drawbacks. While most businesses in the developed world have adapted to this new environment, businesses in many parts of the world lack basic internet access that would allow them to grow and thrive.

The report, Socioeconomic Impact of Broadband in Latin American and Caribbean Countries, consists of two major components which aim to promote broadband internet connection in the region.  The first is an econometric model for LAC countries which helps determine how increases to broadband penetration could affect their GDP.  The second is a set of recommendations designed to help governments best improve their infrastructure.

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Study Shows Lack of Ideas is Not What’s Holding Women Entrepreneurs Back

 

south asian women training

Participants at a recent training workshop for South Asian women’s business associations in Kathmandu.

African women are almost twice as likely to have a new business idea they would like to develop than women in Europe and the United States, according to a new study commissioned by Dell. This is further proof of what many of us already know – that there is no lack of ideas and energy among women entrepreneurs in developing countries. It is institutional barriers and local economic conditions that primarily hold back women who are looking to start a business.

CIPE and its partners have supported women entrepreneurs in a number of countries to make significant gains in increasing their role in the economy and their input to public policy. For example, women’s business associations in Nigeria have successfully advocated to increase their role in a national conference to review the nation’s governing institutions.

In Pakistan, CIPE and its partners worked to reform the National Trade Organizations Ordinance to allow women to form their own associations and improve women’s representation on already established chamber boards. The Bangladesh Women Chamber of Commerce and Industry has successfully advocated for local and national level policies to improve access to credit for women entrepreneurs. And in Papua New Guinea, a new CIPE-supported women’s business association helped to establish a “women’s desk” at the largest commercial bank in the country to make it easier for women entrepreneurs to obtain bank loans.

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Why Free Enterprise Matters for Democracy in Venezuela

By Gustavo Guerrero and Laura Boyette

The economic and political climate in Venezuela today has grown to crisis levels as the government consolidates power and limits the freedoms of entrepreneurs and the private sector through harmful legislation and the nationalization of private businesses. In the face of these challenges, the Federation of Chambers and Associations of Commerce and Production (FEDECAMARAS) continues working hard to advocate for policies that will grow the Venezuelan economy and provide more opportunities to young entrepreneurs, both of which are essential to creating a brighter future for Venezuela. In May Jorge Roig, President of FEDECAMARAS, sat down for an interview with CIPE and discussed the role of the private sector and its advocates in Venezuela.

Roig stressed the importance of cooperation between business, society, and government, saying that without engaging these groups in dialogue, substantive change will not occur. In recent years, the Chávez and Maduro governments have depicted the private sector and organizations such as FEDECAMARAS as the source of Venezuela’s economic problems, claiming they have political aspirations. However, Roig defined the role of FEDECAMARAS very clearly – not to be a political power, but rather to influence it on behalf of entrepreneurs. Furthermore, organizations such as FEDECAMARAS not only protect free enterprise, but also support democratic values and act in the best interests of the society as a whole.

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