Tag Archives: economic reform

Transformational Leadership Wanted

Recipients of the Jose Egardo Campos Collaborative Leadership Awards at the Global Leadership Forum

In today’s world of polarized politics, divisions within societies struggling with the history of divisions feel particularly deep. Countries emerging from conflict, such as Colombia or South Sudan, are striving to make progress toward non-violence and reconciliation. Even in peaceful, mature democracies, the public discourse has become more partisan and polarized than ever. As countries look for transformative leadership to overcome divisions, they struggle with building effective coalitions that could overcome differences and find consensus in key areas.

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Women Head More than a Quarter of Refugee Households. What’s Next for Them?

I am their father. I am their mother. I am everything to them. 

Each year on March 8, the world observes International Women’s Day, a day to recognize both how far we as a global community have come, and also how far we have to go, in achieving gender parity. The World Economic Forum (WEF) estimates that the gender gap won’t close until 2186. 2017’s theme, “Be Bold for Change,” challenges both men and women to take bold actions that will advance the gender agenda; the WEF study also indicates that the economic gender gap is widening—following a peak in 2013, the global economic gap between men and women has now reverted to where it stood in 2008. At this rate, it will take another 170 years to achieve parity.

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Trail Blazing in Sri Lanka: the Sri Lanka Women’s Chamber of Industry and Commerce

Women represent 51.58 percent of the population of Sri Lanka, according to official data published by the Department of Census and Statistics in 2016. However, their participation in the economy remains low. Women make up only 36.5 percent of the 8. 3 million economically active population of the country, aged 15 years and over. Out of the economically inactive population, more than three quarters (75.4 percent) are women. Data compiled by the Department of Census and Statistics for the 3rd quarter of 2016 also shows a higher rate of male participation in the labor force as compared to women, in all age groups and all levels of education. For instance, the highest participation in the workforce for women was reported in the age group 45-49 years (54.1 percent) whereas in the case of men the highest participation rate was in the age group 35-39 (98.1 percent). When looking at these numbers, one wonders how women in Sri Lanka can be empowered to have the same economic opportunities as men do.

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Defending Liberal Democracy in Emerging Markets

From left: Panelists Güray Karacar, Selima Ahmad, Aurelio Concheso, and moderator Karen Kerrigan

Following a wave of global democratization, over the last decade democracies in emerging markets have been tested from above and below. In countries previously seen as successes, citizens are frustrated by economic stagnation and dislocation, dissatisfied with underperforming governments, and divided over identities and values. A new set of anti-establishment, populist leaders have capitalized on this dissatisfaction and are starting to contest the very idea of liberal democracy. The populist approaches have diminished the need for rule of law and challenged the liberal economic order. “We need to respond to the attack on democracy in new ways,” says Carl Gershman, President of the National Endowment for Democracy (NED), and “defend the inter-dependence of liberal democracy and the market economy, without which economic progress and human freedom will not be able to survive.”

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #56: Aurelio Concheso on the Challenge Facing Liberal Democracy in Latin America

Podcast guest Aurelio Concheso

In this week’s Democracy that Delivers podcast, Aurelio Concheso, President of the Advisory Board of Venezuelan think tank Centro de Divulgación del Conocimiento (CEDICE), and a member of CIPE’s Free Enterprise and Democracy Network, discusses populism in Latin America and the challenges to democracy in that region. He uses the example of Chile to discuss the importance of a free market for meeting citizen demands. He also discusses the need for a social context for market reforms, and how open markets and a level playing field create a vested interest in the rule of law by all citizens.

Concheso also talks about how problems with democracy and globalization have led to dissatisfaction and populism, and explains what he considers to be the antidote to the challenges facing democracy in Latin America today.

This podcast refers to a previous CIPE/NED panel discussion event titled “Defending Liberal Democracy in Emerging Markets.” Listen to that discussion here.

Want to hear more? Listen to previous podcasts at CIPE.org/podcast.

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #55: Defending Liberal Democracy in Emerging Markets

(From left to right) Panelists Güray Karacar, Selima Ahmad, Aurelio Concheso, and moderator Karen Kerrigan

In recent years, populist and authoritarian leaders around the world have openly sought to discredit liberal principles and undermine democratic values such as the rule of law and checks on authority. This encroachment on liberal democracy has been accompanied in many cases by attacks on market principles and the suppression of independent business voices.

This week’s podcast is a recording of an event CIPE recently co-hosted with the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) titled Defending Liberal Democracy in Emerging Markets: The Role of Free Markets and Rule of Law.

Specifically, the event explored whether liberal economic reforms and accountability in economic policy can help bolster the consolidation of democracy and, if so, under what conditions.

  • What are the common challenges facing liberal democracy and market economies?
  • What are the economic arguments in support of liberal democracy?
  • How can a free-market system respond to demands for economic and political inclusion?
  • What types of reforms would promote a level playing field and accountability in government?

Opening remarks were provided by:

  • Greg Lebedev, Chair, Center for International Private Enterprise
  • Carl Gershman, President, National Endowment for Democracy

Three members of CIPE’s Free Enterprise and Democracy Network engaged in a panel discussion on the topic:

  • Aurelio Concheso, President of the Advisory Board, Centro de Divulgación del Conocimiento (CEDICE), Venezuela
  • Güray Karacar, Former Secretary General, Corporate Governance Association of Turkey (TKYD)
  • Selima Ahmad, Founder and President, Bangladesh Women Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BWCCI)

The discussion was moderated by:

  • Karen Kerrigan, President and CEO, Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council

We hope you enjoy the conversation!

Want to hear more? Listen to previous podcasts at CIPE.org/podcast.

Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or on your Android device.

Like this podcast? Please review us on iTunes to help other listeners find the show.

Private Sector Innovation in Refugee Response and Why it Matters

More than five and a half years deep into the Syrian war, the development aid space is crowded: crowded with emergency relief agencies working to supply besieged communities with critical food supplies and healthcare; crowded with multinational donors working to catalyze economic and political change in the Middle East’s countries of first asylum.

In these countries—namely, Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey— many development organizations and practitioners have shifted the focus away from immediate, emergency assistance. Instead, they are opting for initiatives designed to generate longer-term, sustainable solutions for refugees and host communities on everything from livelihoods to mental health.

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