Tag Archives: development

Community and Political Actors Present ‘Ideas for Rebuilding Nepal’ to the Government

On April 25, a devastating earthquake of 7.8 magnitude rocked the central region of Nepal, claiming over 8000 lives, injuring thousands, and leaving another 2.8 million people homeless. The government of Nepal has been posed with one of its biggest disaster-related challenges in recent history. Despite the looming challenges that remain, a window of opportunity has emerged for Nepal to mobilize the energy and enthusiasm of its citizens for a better, more prosperous country. The fabric of Nepali society—which exemplifies cooperation, tolerance, and compassion— has been on clear display in the voluntary efforts of various non-governmental organizations (NGOs), civil society groups, and individuals alike. This energy marks a new beginning for Nepali society and politics.

In June, CIPE Nepal partner, Samriddhi, the Prosperity Foundation (Samriddhi) held a two day conference under its Nepal Leaders’ Circle initiative. Nepal Leaders’ Circle is a platform for reform-minded politicians to deliberate policies affecting the country. The conference, held at the Nepal Administrative Staff College in Lalitpur, brought together key actors from Nepal’s government, NGOs, community based organizations (CBOs), and private sector. These individuals have been on the ground in both the immediate relief and reconstruction efforts. The purpose of the conference was to share a common platform to discuss respective ideas to rebuild Nepal.

The conference addressed two primary themes: institutional mechanisms for disaster preparedness and management and the journey ahead in reviving Nepal’s economy, financing reconstruction, and promoting growth. Over the course of two days, 11 sessions with 63 expert speakers were held, with over 800 individuals from more than 100 organizations.

The two-day conference was a major success and was well covered in the local media. The private sector’s innovation and entrepreneurship was highlighted as a key mechanism for rebuilding the country’s economy. Participants emphasized the use of locally available wisdom, knowledge, and resources while incorporating globally available lessons on post-earthquake management.

The conference highlighted certain characteristics of the reconstruction plan that will particularly focus on economic revival and growth. They are as follows:

  • A focus on micro, small, and medium enterprises that form the backbone of Nepali economy;
  • A strategy for involving the private sector in the overall reconstruction process and increasing private sector investment;
  • A policy initiative that understands and responds to the realities and demands of communities and incorporates a holistic approach to the geological, socio-cultural, and economic realities of the affected areas;
  • Creation of space for innovation and experimentation; and
  • Fast track decision-making and better governance.

While challenges remain for Nepal’s economic reconstruction, it is clear that this is a turning point in the socio-economic history of the country. If its citizens are able to institutionalize reforms, especially those targeting economic growth and disaster preparedness, the country will be able to recover and revive its emerging economy.

Medhawi Giri is the Program Assistant for South Asia at CIPE. 

CIPE Launches First Annual Photo Competition

Photo: © 2011 Swapping aid for trade in northern Uganda, Pete Lewis/UK Department for International Development

Photo: © 2011 Swapping aid for trade in northern Uganda, Pete Lewis/UK Department for International Development

“There is one thing the photograph must contain, the humanity of the moment.” – Robert Frank

Show us your best story-telling photo

Do you like to tell stories through photography? Then show us your best work! The first annual Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) Photo Competition is now open for submissions.

Open to participants of all ages, including student, amateur, and professional photographers, the inaugural photo competition will focus on the theme of Entrepreneurship.

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How Multi-Stakeholder Platforms Help Build an Enabling Environment for Business

betty-maina-ppd

“The work of development is too important to be left in the hands of governments alone. It is the responsibility of everyone. Especially the business community… Business, like governments, will have to be at the forefront of this change. No one can do it alone.”

In the latest Economic Reform Feature Service article, CIPE partner and Chief Executive Officer of the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM) Betty Maina highlights the crucial role of multi-stakeholder platforms in an enabling business environment.

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Public-Private Dialogue: The Key to Good Governance and Development

An increasing number of policy and governance challenges around the world demand private sector participation to generate viable solutions. Such challenges include poverty reduction, inclusive growth, government accountability, business integrity, national competitiveness, innovation, and access to opportunity. Although the obstacles to dialogue can be high, the value of dialogue is now widely recognized by governments and business leaders alike. Notably, the 4th High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in Busan, Korea, recommended that countries embrace “inclusive dialogue for building a policy environment conducive to sustainable development.”

In CIPE’s latest Economic Reform Feature Service article, Benjamin Herzberg, Program Lead, Leadership, Learning and Innovation at the World Bank Group, my colleague Kim Bettcher, Senior Knowledge Manager at CIPE, and I explore the importance of PPD and discuss its practical applications around the world. 

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2015 and Beyond: Considering the New Development Agenda

“The year 2015 offers a unique opportunity for global leaders and people to end poverty, transform the world to better meet human needs and the necessities of economic transformation, while protecting our environment, ensuring peace and realizing human rights. We are at a historic crossroads, and the directions we take will determine whether we will succeed or fail on our promises,” said United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon in the synthesis report on the post-2015 agenda.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are rooted in an agreement reached during the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development held in Rio de Janeiro in June 2012, otherwise known as Rio+20, and the adoption of the outcome document, “The Future We Want.” As a cornerstone for the post-2015 development agenda, the 17 SDGs begin where unfinished work of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) left off, with aspirations of poverty eradication, inclusion, human rights, equality, and sustainability.

The Center for International Private Enterprise together with Creative Associates International recently held a forum with Pauline Baker of the Fund for Peace, Tony Pipa of United States Agency for International Development (USAID), J.W. Wright of Creative Associates, and Amb. James Michel, author of “Shaping the New Development Agenda” (available in full or abridged versions), which guided the conversation.

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“Betrayed” – The Search for Inclusion in Development

betrayedWhy have China and Ghana achieved impressive growth and poverty reduction while Nigeria has seen an increase in poverty even as its economy grew to be the largest in Africa? The answer to this question lies in the relationships between the poor and elites, and specifically in patterns of social inclusion and exclusion. That is the conclusion reached by Seth Kaplan in his book Betrayed: Politics, Power, and Prosperity, based on a study of scholarly literature and personal observations in developing countries. Without a doubt, inclusion presents a fundamental challenge of development, and Kaplan has dug down to frame the core of the problem.

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Who Will Reap the Benefits of China’s Growing Presence in Africa?

By Brian Jackson

Recently, there have been many articles in the media outlining both the positive and negative implications of China’s growing investment in Africa. On one hand, many accuse China of promoting another period of colonization and exploitation on the continent and preventing Africa from becoming economically independent. Yet on the other hand, some praise the investments for rejuvenating African industries and infrastructure.

With such conflicting interpretations, many are left wondering how to view all of this. Is Chinese involvement in Africa a good thing, or bad thing? Will it lead to more economic and democratic opportunities for the continent and people, or the opposite?

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