Tag Archives: democratic governance

Democracy that Delivers Podcast #56: Aurelio Concheso on the Challenge Facing Liberal Democracy in Latin America

Podcast guest Aurelio Concheso

In this week’s Democracy that Delivers podcast, Aurelio Concheso, President of the Advisory Board of Venezuelan think tank Centro de Divulgación del Conocimiento (CEDICE), and a member of CIPE’s Free Enterprise and Democracy Network, discusses populism in Latin America and the challenges to democracy in that region. He uses the example of Chile to discuss the importance of a free market for meeting citizen demands. He also discusses the need for a social context for market reforms, and how open markets and a level playing field create a vested interest in the rule of law by all citizens.

Concheso also talks about how problems with democracy and globalization have led to dissatisfaction and populism, and explains what he considers to be the antidote to the challenges facing democracy in Latin America today.

This podcast refers to a previous CIPE/NED panel discussion event titled “Defending Liberal Democracy in Emerging Markets.” Listen to that discussion here.

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #55: Defending Liberal Democracy in Emerging Markets

(From left to right) Panelists Güray Karacar, Selima Ahmad, Aurelio Concheso, and moderator Karen Kerrigan

In recent years, populist and authoritarian leaders around the world have openly sought to discredit liberal principles and undermine democratic values such as the rule of law and checks on authority. This encroachment on liberal democracy has been accompanied in many cases by attacks on market principles and the suppression of independent business voices.

This week’s podcast is a recording of an event CIPE recently co-hosted with the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) titled Defending Liberal Democracy in Emerging Markets: The Role of Free Markets and Rule of Law.

Specifically, the event explored whether liberal economic reforms and accountability in economic policy can help bolster the consolidation of democracy and, if so, under what conditions.

  • What are the common challenges facing liberal democracy and market economies?
  • What are the economic arguments in support of liberal democracy?
  • How can a free-market system respond to demands for economic and political inclusion?
  • What types of reforms would promote a level playing field and accountability in government?

Opening remarks were provided by:

  • Greg Lebedev, Chair, Center for International Private Enterprise
  • Carl Gershman, President, National Endowment for Democracy

Three members of CIPE’s Free Enterprise and Democracy Network engaged in a panel discussion on the topic:

  • Aurelio Concheso, President of the Advisory Board, Centro de Divulgación del Conocimiento (CEDICE), Venezuela
  • Güray Karacar, Former Secretary General, Corporate Governance Association of Turkey (TKYD)
  • Selima Ahmad, Founder and President, Bangladesh Women Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BWCCI)

The discussion was moderated by:

  • Karen Kerrigan, President and CEO, Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council

We hope you enjoy the conversation!

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #53: Jerzy Pomianowski on Supporting Democracy and Freedom in the EU Neighborhood

Podcast guest Jerzy Pomianowski (Photo courtesy of Deutsche Welle /K. Danetzki via Flickr)

This week on the Democracy that Delivers podcast, Executive Director of the European Endowment for Democracy (EED) Jerzy Pomianowski discusses how the EED came about and the focus of its work today. He shares his philosophy that democracy can only truly be generated from within society, not imposed from outside, which is the basis for EED’s demand-driven model of support. He also talks about the importance of flexibility when adjusting to a rapidly changing environment and discusses the EED’s rapid response projects that meet urgent demands for support.

Pomianowski also discusses the need for a new political philosophy to communicate the promise of democracy and solidarity, and how his experience as a student activist in Poland shapes his drive to help those taking risks today to support democracy and freedom in their countries.

Want to hear more? Listen to previous podcasts at CIPE.org/podcast.

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Iraq’s Political Wrestling Arena

In Iraq, former governments spent billions of dollars to sustain the public sector at the cost of future generations with little foresight of potential economic ramifications. The public sector expanded to such a degree that the private sector was left with few opportunities to contribute to the economic development of the country. Past governments used the public sector as a tool to gain the votes and support of unemployed youth by employing thousands of them in public sector jobs prior to each election cycle. As a result, they were able to increase their political patronage. The public sector system of political, ethnic, and sectarian quotas, which divides positions in the Iraqi government based on sect, ethnicity, and political affiliation regardless of competency, resulted in inefficient administrations lacking capability and demonstrating an inability to provide necessary services. Such incompetence and weak rule of law increased corruption, permeating both the public and private institutions in the country. This chaotic situation offered an opportunity for corrupt political parties and their nominated governmental officials to abuse official positions and accumulate wealth and power.

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Drivers of Violent Extremism

The Kabul Bank scandal is a prominent case of corruption that undermines governance, and an example of one of a number of factors that can drive extremism.

Extremist violence presents a serious threat to democratic values and societies around the world. The last decade has witnessed increased attention to how and why individuals become involved in extremist violence, including “push” and “pull” factors. “Push” factors are underlying conditions favoring the rise or spread of violent extremism (VE). “Pull” factors work on an individual level and have a direct impact on recruitment and radicalization. They include: social status and respect from peers, a sense of belonging, adventure, and self-esteem, and the prospect of achieving glory and fame. There has tended to be an over-emphasis on the search for broad root causes and an under-emphasis on the examination of individual motivations. This tendency has reduced the success of past programs seeking to counter VE. In the future, programming should focus on preventative measures aimed at preempting radicalization by mitigating specific drivers that are known to heighten the likelihood of VE.

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Another Baldrige Ambassador Takes the Message Overseas

By Dawn Marie Bailey

The following is an interview with William Pawlucy, CIPE Consultant… about his work with Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. Based outside of Washington, D.C., the Baldrige Program helps organizations identify, understand, and manage the factors that determine their success. Through his work with CIPE, Pawlucy has traveled to the Palestinian Territories and Jordan to work with business associations and CIPE partners on improving their organizational and financial sustainability. He is currently a member of CIPE’s team on the Local Enterprise Support (LENS) Project, a USAID/FHI360-funded initiative that works to enhance the effectiveness of Jordanian business support organizations and promote growth for micro and small enterprises. Pawlucy’s engagement with associations through the LENS Project builds on his work with the Baldrige Program; he is developing targeted organizational strengthening programs for several business associations, based in part on the standards of performance excellence used by Baldrige. This article originally appeared on Blogrige, the official blog of Baldrige Performance Excellence Program and has been reposted with permission from the author.

The Baldrige Program has always been fortunate to have engaged ambassadors—many of whom are current or former examiners, judges, or overseers—who carry the Baldrige message of continuous improvement, core values, and a systems perspective, as well as the Baldrige framework itself, with them when they speak in the Unites States and abroad. In Blogrige, we’ve written about such ambassadors traveling to India, China, Southeast Asia, South Africa, and elsewhere. [Please accept this note as a sincere thank you to those folks and others who support Baldrige.]

William Pawlucy, CAE

Below is another story of a Baldrige community member’s travels; this time the story takes place in the Middle East. William Pawlucy served on the Board of Examiners in 2012 and now does work for the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE), whose mission is to “strengthen democracy around the globe through private enterprise and market-oriented reform.” Pawlucy and his colleagues have raised awareness of Baldrige resources in places across the region, including Jordan, Lebanon, the Palestinian Territories, and Egypt.

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #49: Ali Ayadi on Progress in Tunisia’s Democratic Transition

Podcast guest Ali Ayadi with guest hosts Barbara Broomell (center) and Ashley Fox

On this week’s Democracy That Delivers podcast, CIPE Country Representative for Tunisia Ali Ayadi talks about the country’s democratic transition since the revolution and areas of progress and challenge. Ayadi talks about a missing element in the country’s transformation – economic growth and development. He discusses how the government and the private sector are working together to improve the business environment in the country to boost growth and create much-needed jobs and  the role of women in the new political system. He also talks about what it was like to move back to his home country after many years  of working in Washington, DC and his current work with local leaders to help carve a path forward for Tunisia.

This podcast episode was co-hosted by CIPE Program Officer for the Middle East and North Africa Barbara Broomell and Communications and Digital Content Coordinator Ashley Fox.

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