Tag Archives: corruption

Democracy that Delivers #98: How Countries Can Overcome Challenges to Enforcing Anti-Corruption Laws

From left: podcast guest Drago Kos, guest host Frank Brown and host Ken Jaques

OECD’s Drago Kos says passing anti-corruption laws is much easier than enforcing them in most countries. Kos, who chairs the OECD’s Working Group on Bribery, is the guest of this week’s podcast and discusses the difficulties many nations face when implementing anti-corruption measures. Kos shares new details about groundbreaking work the OECD is doing to help foreign governments implement anti-corruption policies, fight poverty, and restore confidence in local markets. The OECD, short for Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, has 35 member countries worldwide and works closely with international businesses.

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Democracy that Delivers #92: Former US Ambassador Pifer Discusses the Evolution of Ukraine from Former Soviet Republic to a Democratic State

From left: podcast guest Steven Pifer, guest host Eric Hontz and host Ken Jaques

In this week’s podcast, Steven Pifer, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and former Ambassador to Ukraine, guides the listener through the development of U.S. diplomatic relations with Ukraine following the breakup of the Soviet Union through the present. He talks about the progress Ukraine has made from a former Soviet Republic to a democracy. While there have been successes and failures, much has been accomplished in the area of economic development and a transition to a market economy. But much more needs to be done in Ukraine, particularly with respect to the biggest threat to democracy there according to Pifer: corruption.

Pifer was the U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine from 1998 to 2000.

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Democracy that Delivers #90: Frank Vogl on Confronting Corruption in the Private Sector

From left: podcast guest Frank Vogl, guest host Louisa Tomar and host Ken Jaques

Businesses that take on corruption and pursue a path of integrity can come out ahead financially, says Frank Vogl, anti-corruption expert and adjunct professor at Georgetown University.

During the podcast, Vogl explains how corruption can hurt a company’s bottom line. Integrity, on the other hand, is good for business because it allows companies to be innovative and builds trust amongst members of the organization.

Vogl began his career as a journalist, covering corruption scandals during the Nixon and Ford presidency. In the late 1970s, Vogl covered the Lockheed scandals that led to the passage of the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act. Despite this law and other efforts to curb corruption, it is still an endemic problem in the private sector, he says.

Vogl is a founding member of Transparency International, a nonprofit organization that works with governments, businesses and citizens to stop corruption.

For more information about Vogl, his blogs, lectures and a new book visit his website.

For more of Vogl’s insights on curbing corruption in the private sector, read CIPE’s Corporate Compliance Trends (CCTrends) blog by Louisa Tomar, guest podcast cohost and CIPE’s program officer for Global Programs.

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Confronting Corruption in Asia’s New Democracies

Corruption is detrimental to countries’ economies because it leads to reduced productivity, high unemployment, and poverty. In addition to the economic cost, corruption corrodes democracies by weakening citizens’ confidence in their governments. This distrust and disenfranchisement can drive people to join extremist groups. “In conflict-affected areas, especially where Al-Qaeda or the Islamic State are trying to set up shop, economic grievances make it much easier to recruit local nationals into their fight,” commented Jennifer Anderson, CIPE’s senior program officer for South Asia. “Not only is corruption debilitating democracy in Afghanistan, it’s also leading to recruitment. Right now in Afghanistan, the Taliban has either control or influence over 40 percent of the country.”

Anderson spoke in a CIPE panel discussion in July that examined the issue of corruption in Asia, with a focus on Afghanistan and Cambodia. Other panelists included experts from CIPE’s Asia Department; the Hudson Institute; and SILAKA, a Cambodian nonprofit organization.

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Defending Liberal Democracy in Emerging Markets

From left: Panelists Güray Karacar, Selima Ahmad, Aurelio Concheso, and moderator Karen Kerrigan

Following a wave of global democratization, over the last decade democracies in emerging markets have been tested from above and below. In countries previously seen as successes, citizens are frustrated by economic stagnation and dislocation, dissatisfied with underperforming governments, and divided over identities and values. A new set of anti-establishment, populist leaders have capitalized on this dissatisfaction and are starting to contest the very idea of liberal democracy. The populist approaches have diminished the need for rule of law and challenged the liberal economic order. “We need to respond to the attack on democracy in new ways,” says Carl Gershman, President of the National Endowment for Democracy (NED), and “defend the inter-dependence of liberal democracy and the market economy, without which economic progress and human freedom will not be able to survive.”

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #51: Podcast Throwback

It is Inauguration Week here in Washington, DC and in honor of this important symbol of democracy we are highlighting two conversations that have taken place on the podcast over the last year that focus on democratic and economic development and the link between the two:

Podcast guest Claude Fontheim (left) with hosts Julie Johnson and Ken Jaques.

In the first podcast throwback episode, CIPE Board member Claude Fontheim talked about how the rule of law, transparency, and good governance underpin strong, inclusive development. Fontheim explained that investment alone is not enough and that support for public institutions is needed to ensure that the benefits of trade and economic growth reach all segments of society. He discussed the direct link between development around the world and U.S. national security interests. Fontheim also talked about how U.S. companies contribute to the good governance of countries they invest in, and how they partner with NGOs and civil society to support initiatives in sectors such as health, education, and women’s rights.

Guest Dr. Kim Holmes (center) with hosts Jennifer Anderson and Ken Jaques.

In the second, Distinguished Fellow at The Heritage Foundation and recently returned CIPE Board member (after a 15 year hiatus) Dr. Kim Holmes discussed how his views on democratic and economic development have evolved through the years. Holmes explained specifically how his views on the role of economic development in conflict zones has changed and why. He also talked at length about his new book, The Closing of the Liberal Mind: How Groupthink and Intolerance Define the Left. 

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Democracy that Delivers Podcast #50: Marc Schleifer on Democratic Trends in Europe, Eurasia, and South Asia

Podcast guest Marc Schleifer

CIPE Regional Director for Europe, Eurasia, and South Asia Marc Schleifer works on democracy projects in vastly different parts of the globe. On today’s episode of the Democracy that Delivers podcast he discusses the trends that are affecting the health and development of democracy in his areas of focus, including the attitudes and outlooks of the citizens in each region.

Schleifer describes his early interest in social issues and how his fascination with Russia led to eight years living in the country working in law and international development (and his brief stint as a rock musician). His recollections from this time, including the exciting and chaotic mood in pre-Putin Russia, contrast sharply with his assessment of Russia both today and in the near future. He also talks about the rise in populist sentiment in many parts of the world and challenges us to avoid knee-jerk reactions and look at the political and economic developments behind it.

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