Tag Archives: corporate governance

Investing in Corporate Governance Practice in Palestine

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Program Officer Stephen Rosenlund discusses best practices in corporate governance based on CIPE’s experience in the MENA region.

On September 9-10 in Ramallah, I had the privilege of participating in a CIPE-supported training workshop on corporate governance with the leaders and technical staff of nine Palestinian chambers of commerce from the West Bank. This was an unprecedented gathering organized by our partner the Palestine Governance Institute (PGI) and the Federation of Chambers of Commerce, Industry, and Agriculture to activate the chambers as resources for their member firms on corporate governance matters.

The two-day training workshop immersed participants in applicable legal and regulatory frameworks, the role of oversight institutions, and best practices in corporate governance at the firm level. While the different requirements applicable to publicly traded and private companies were examined, presenters emphasized the imperative for all firms regardless of size or ownership structure to adopt sound corporate governance practices. Data from numerous studies show that investing in corporate governance is a good business decision that enhances the performance and sustainability of companies. In addition, it has a positive aggregate effect on society in the form of economic development.

Moreover, well-governed companies tend to act ethically — by resisting paying bribes, for example — and therefore reduce the amount of corruption in society. A private sector that has its own house in order is also better positioned to engage in dialogue with public officials to bring about needed policy, legal, and regulatory reforms that will improve the environment for business.

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Governance Principles for Business Associations and Chambers of Commerce: Now Available in Urdu

urdu-gov-principlesBusiness associations need strong governance systems and guiding principles in order to effectively serve their members and act as advocates for policy change. In Pakistan, business associations are mostly struggling to adapt effective governing mechanisms that could ease the path to successfully achieving their vision, mission, and objectives.

Societal norms are changing, the business environment is getting more complex and challenging, and following the principles of corporate governance should now be one of the foremost issues that business associations must address.

CIPE has a huge online library of resources and publications through which business associations can get instant guidance and support. In order to facilitate good governance principles within business associations, CIPE and the World Chambers Federation (WCF) developed a guide on Governance Principles for Business Associations and Chambers of Commerce. The guide was originally published in English and subsequently translated in to Arabic, French, Russian, Spanish and Dari languages.

To support and further simplify good governance principles in the country, CIPE Pakistan has produced an Urdu Translation of these principles (available here) for the benefit of business associations all across Pakistan that can be further guided with local language clarity.

Emad Sohail is a Senior Program Officer at CIPE Pakistan.

Addressing the 98 Percent: Supporting Reform Among Family Firms in the Palestinian Territories

pgi-cgMore than 98 percent of commercial entities in Palestine are not covered by existing corporate governance codes, which apply to companies listed on the Palestine Stock Exchange and commercial banks. Most of these are structured as family firms — whether in ownership or management — which creates special difficulties for corporate governance.

To address the thousands of family firms that form the heart and soul of the Palestinian private sector, CIPE partner the Palestine Governance Institute (PGI) recently published a Corporate Governance Manual for Family Firms (available in Arabic and English) with the Federation of Palestinian Chambers of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture.

This seminal publication — the first of its kind in Palestine — was informed by extensive consultations with local experts, family firms themselves, and other stakeholders including lawyers and academics.

PGI engaged in extensive outreach to the business community in developing these guidelines, including conducting a baseline assessment through interviews with over 100 owners and managers of family firms across the West Bank and Gaza.

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A Ray of Hope on Health Care from an Unlikely Source

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Health care professionals in Egypt conduct a stakeholder analysis to help spell out governance principles for Egyptian hospitals.

A hip replacement in the United States, paid for out-of-pocket (i.e., without health insurance), would cost anywhere from $11,000 to $125,000, depending on what hospital you go to, according to a 2013 survey of 100 hospitals featured on National Public Radio.  And that was among the hospitals that, when asked, could actually produce a quote – 40 of the 100 hospitals surveyed couldn’t quote a price at all.

Those fortunate enough to have insurance don’t need to worry about price-shopping.  When I go to my primary care physician, I pay a $20 co-pay.  (Under our previous insurance, provided by my wife’s former employer, it was $10.  Why the difference?  Who knows?)  I have no idea how much my insurance company pays the doctor.  I suppose I could find out, but… honestly?  There’s really no compelling reason for me to do so.  It’s $20 no matter who I see.

And it turns out that, even if there were more incentive for me to price-shop, more expensive hospitals aren’t necessarily better hospitals, according to a 2014 study.

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Linking Growth and Governance for Inclusive Development and Effective International Cooperation

FSmarch31Academics and development practitioners have long sought out commonalities of sustainable economic growth in different economies around the world. While there is no one formula for achieving economic growth and stability, inclusive growth and accountable governance have been central components of progress. Effective governance, while not traditionally thought of as part of an international development agenda, has come to be seen as an essential component of international economic development.

In the latest Economic Reform Feature Service article, consultant James Michel explores the complex relationship between good governance and economic development around the world. He looks at the ways in which academics and practical experience shape these two intertwined factors of development.

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Current Trends in the Relationship Between Boards and Compliance Officers

boardrelationshipBy Hyeji Kim

Any corporate compliance program needs a strong relationship between the board of directors and the compliance and ethics officer in order to be effective. In 2010, the Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics (SCCE) and the Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) conducted a study which showed that the relationship between the Chief Ethics and Compliance Officers (CECOs) and boards of directors was much weaker than it should be. In 2013, SCCE conducted the study again to see if there were any changes.

The recently published 2013 study, based on over 600 responses from compliance and ethic professionals in the SCCE and HCCA database, seems to be on a much brighter note with generally positive findings.

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Why Transparency Matters for Emerging Market Companies

Markets thrive on transparency. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

Markets thrive on transparency. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

Many of the world’s largest and fastest-growing companies now come from emerging markets. But according to a recent report, these companies lag behind their more established peers in transparency — a handicap that could prevent them from becoming true global leaders in their fields.

Looking at 100 large multinational companies from 16 emerging market countries, Transparency International found an average transparency score of just 3.6 out of 10. A 2012 report on the world’s largest companies using the same methodology found an average score of 4.7. And while only one in five of the emerging-market multinationals had a transparency score above 5.0, just under half of the largest companies did.

These results should be deeply concerning for the executives of these companies, their investors, and the governments and citizens of countries where they operate.

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