Tag Archives: compliance

How Kenya’s Private Sector is Addressing the “Supply Side” of Corruption

Photo: Citizen Digital

Photo: Citizen Digital

A recent report by Kenya’s Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC) paints a rather grim picture of the extent of corruption in Kenya. In the top 10 counties by average bribe size, bribes range from KSH 80,000 (about $800 US) to about KSH 6,000 ($60 US) — in a country where the average monthly wage is just $76. Situations where bribes are most commonly solicited include obtaining basic services such as medical attention or a national identity card. Not surprisingly, Transparency International puts Kenya at 139th out of 168 countries in its latest corruption ranking.

Even a cursory review of Kenyan daily news coverage shows that corruption at all levels (from county to national) and in all its forms (from bribes to graft) is a major issue of concern for the country. Many commentators express frustration at the extent of the problem and the dearth of constructive solutions. Against that background, CIPE and its partner organization, the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM), are working to help change Kenya’s corruption-tainted narrative and provide the private sector with tools to proactively build integrity into business operations.

To that end, CIPE, KAM, and Global Compact Network Kenya (GCNK), where KAM serves as the secretariat, created a joint training program for Kenyan companies on anti-corruption compliance. The training is based on CIPE’s Anti-Corruption Compliance: A Guide for Mid-Sized Companies in Emerging Markets and was adapted to the unique needs and concerns of local businesses. As KAM’s Chairman Pradeep Paunrana put it, “You cannot clap with one hand, it takes two people to make a corrupt deal.” Through this initiative, Kenya’s private sector is taking responsibility for holding itself to a higher standard and disrupting the “supply side” of corruption.

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Leave it to the Ladies: Addressing Corruption Head-on to Attract Foreign Investment in Africa

Photo: U.S. Department of State

Photo: U.S. Department of State

This post originally appeared on CIPE’s Corporate Compliance Trends blog.

Despite the thick Lagos air and long journey 60 women entered the The Moorhouse hotel on a recent Saturday morning, exchanging excited greetings and fresh ideas. Women business leaders adorned in brightly colored fabric and empowered with strong ambitions went around the room introducing themselves and their businesses.

It was the inaugural meeting of the Lagos chapter of the African Women’s Entrepreneurship Program (AWEP), launched by the U.S. Department of State in July 2010 to assist women entrepreneurs across sub-Saharan Africa. The program supports African women entrepreneurs to promote business growth, increase trade both regionally and to U.S. markets, create better business environments, and empower African women entrepreneurs to become voices of change in their communities.

Although AWEP in Nigeria initially started as a group of women’s businesses in agriculture, the members now represent a variety of sectors including fashion, textiles, professional services, cosmetics, and home decor.  Since AWEP’s inception, chapters such as the Lagos chapter have started all over Africa bringing together 1,600 women entrepreneurs and 33 business associations across the continent creating over 17,000 jobs.

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Carrots Before Sticks

scce-blog

This post originally appeared on the SCCE Compliance & Ethics blog.

I was truly honored to attend this year’s Compliance and Ethics Institute (CEI) in Las Vegas, and to present with my colleague Frank Brown, CIPE’s experience with motivating mid-sized businesses in emerging markets to launch compliance programs. Our session was one of the opening ones scheduled at 9am on Sunday morning (did I mention we were in Vegas?) so it was abundantly clear to us that everyone who attended was truly dedicated to the cause!

As we’ve heard throughout the event, emerging markets pose many compliance risks, especially in the area of anti-corruption. Local enforcement may be lax and bribery remains common in business transactions. What is more, under laws such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or the UK Bribery Act, it is not just the behavior of a company’s own employees but also the conduct of it suppliers, agents, and other business partners that’s of concern.

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Fighting Corruption Matters for Indonesia’s Oil and Gas Industry

indonesia-event

“If a company’s goal is to stay in business for a long time, why take the shortcut and pay bribes, which can damage the company in the long term?” asked Sammy Hamzah, president of Indonesian Petroleum Association, at the launch event of CIPE and International Business Links (IBL)’s new Anti-Corruption Compliance guidebook for mid-sized companies in Indonesia’s oil and gas industry.

“When a company commits a corrupt behavior, it takes on average 20 to 30 years to bring back the company’s credibility.”

Corruption is a major problem in Indonesia. According to a Gallup poll, more than 8 in 10 Indonesians say that corruption is widespread throughout the nation’s government and businesses. The oil and gas sector is particularly susceptible to corruption because of the multiple steps in the procurement and licensing processes, as well as the sheer amount of the money involved.

That’s why CIPE and IBL produced the guide. It’s intended to help mid-sized companies looking to become suppliers of local or international oil and gas companies to understand the business case for anti-corruption compliance and instruct them on how to create an internal compliance system.

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Investing in Ethics

Loss of profits and market share, diminishing brand reputation, and costly fines threaten companies that do not meet the international standards of ethics. As evident in the wake of scandals involving top brands such as Apple and Nike for example, today’s consumers are becoming better educated about overseas working conditions and the unfair treatment of workers.

As corporate social responsibility (CSR) has risen as a top priority in operations and supply chains, Software Advice, affiliated with Garner – one of the world’s leading information technology research and advisory companies – investigates “which link in the [supply] chain consumers claim to care about most.” In this report examining how corporate social responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, Software Advice assessed consumers’ willingness to pay more for ethical products. Three separate phases of surveys polled a nationally representative dataset of approximately 385 respondents.

In one survey, Software Advice asked three different groups of consumers how much more they were willing to pay for a product, normally priced at $100 that was produced more ethically with respect to a particular link in the supply chain: raw materials, manufacturing, and distribution. Respondents indicated that they would pay an average of $18.50 more if the raw materials were ethically sourced and as much as $27.60 more for a product that was made in good working conditions. 

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CIPE Executive Director and Partners Honored in Ethisphere Business Ethics Ranking

This post originally appeared on Corporate Compliance Trends.

Ethics is an increasingly important component of doing business for both small and medium sized enterprises to multinational corporations in today’s globalized world. The Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) has long been an active advocate for better business practices with its focus on anti-corruption initiatives and promoting corporate social responsibility.

Ethisphere Institute, a global leader in defining and advancing the standards of ethical business practices, recognized CIPE leaders and partners for their contributions to advancing business ethics. Ethisphere magazine listed CIPE’s Executive Director John D. Sullivan and Michael Hershman, member of CIPE’s board of directors, as the top 100 most influential individuals in business ethics in 2014.

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Building a Culture of Compliance in Emerging Markets

ac-guide-launch

Corruption is a destructive tax on business that hampers entrepreneurship and economic development. In the last two decades significant progress has been made in making the fight against corruption a top priority for governments and businesses worldwide.

Yet many challenges remain, including spreading best practices in anti-corruption compliance beyond large companies to smaller firms in global value chains. The launch of CIPE’s new guide on anti-corruption compliance for mid-sized companies in emerging markets, held yesterday in Washington, DC, at the OpenGov Hub, focused on ways to boost third party compliance in difficult environments.

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