Category Archives: Global

Reducing Third-Party Company Risks in Emerging Markets

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This post originally appeared on CIPE’s Corporate Compliance Trends blog.

As the world’s multinational companies seek profits in new, high-risk markets, they inevitably start depending on local businesses – third parties – to operate. Such partnerships bring with them both the promise of mutual growth and, for the multinational, responsibility for the behavior of its new local partner. That’s because aggressively applied laws such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) hold the multinationals responsible for third parties’ behavior.

Of the estimated 106 companies currently under investigation for FCPA-related violations, a significant number of them are related to suspected third party wrongdoing – assuming that past settlements made public are a reliable guide. So, how to reduce the corruption risks presented by doing business with third parties in developing countries where bribery is an accepted practice? CIPE is working on finding answers. So, too, is one of the world’s leading risk management firms,  SAI Global, which recently presented a webinar and offered a few tips on how to construct an anti-corruption training program for third parties.

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Youth Entrepreneurship at CIPE

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Youth play a vital role in shaping the future of every country in the world and yet they are often excluded from the economic and political decision-making process.  For those countries in the world that are striving for democracy based on market-oriented reforms, young people must play an active role as youth entrepreneurs expand opportunities, unleash individual initiative and help to cultivate individual citizens who have a stake in society and democratic governance.

CIPE recognizes the important role youth play in fostering democracy and the free market in developing countries.  As a result, CIPE focuses on building skills through entrepreneurship and management programs and supporting chambers of commerce and business associations that provide networking, services, and forums for young leaders.

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Introducing Corporate Compliance Trends, a Website for Anti-Corruption Compliance in Emerging and Frontier Markets

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The need for anti-corruption compliance programs in companies of all sizes in global value chains has never been greater. Since 2006, the U.S. government has settled or prosecuted nearly 300 corruption cases against companies from around the world, including many where the corrupt conduct originated from multinational corporations’ suppliers, vendors, and agents. The average cost of resolving these enforcement actions now tops $80 million.

Beyond the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and the UK Bribery Act, new anti-corruption laws with international reach are hitting the books, such as Brazil’s Clean Companies Act, introduced earlier this year. Similarly, many international bodies, including the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the International Chamber of Commerce, have introduced conventions and norms meant to combat bribery of foreign officials. Few doubt that this growing global trend toward rooting corruption out of international business conduct is here to stay.

Still, as a recent study found, the number of global companies with anti-corruption policies has increased by only 1 percent over the past two years, and a sizable minority of these companies have yet to implement even the most basic of compliance programs. Nearly 60 percent of global companies surveyed said they never train third parties despite the fact that many compliance actions have resulted from conduct by agents or intermediaries.

While governments and international organizations set anti-corruption rules and standards, and while law enforcement agencies around the world aggressively pursue potential violations, many companies simply lack sufficient practical knowledge on how to comply with these new global norms. Understanding what effective anti-corruption compliance looks like and how to set up internal compliance programs that mitigate the risk of corruption is an especially daunting challenge for firms operating in emerging and frontier markets, where the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) has worked since 1983 with local partners such as chambers of commerce, business associations, and economic think tanks.

To share our experiences from supporting private sector-focused anti-corruption programs in high-risk countries around the globe, and to help advance international best practices on anti-corruption compliance in these countries, CIPE is launching this new website, Corporate Compliance Trends.

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How Youth Are Working to Solve Global Problems

Youth around the world are agents of change. They are political and economic leaders and participants in their communities, and have many thoughts on how to shape their nation’s future.

As part of celebrating such individuals on International Youth Day, two recent CIPE-Atlas Corps Think Tank LINKS alumni – Fayyaz Yaseen from Pakistan and Iryna Fedets from Ukraine – analyzed two issues young people care about in their communities: youth unemployment and anti-corruption. In this week’s Economic Reform Feature Service articles, the two authors explore how to bring about democratic and economic reform changes in their respective countries.

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The Challenge of Anti-Corruption Compliance for Emerging and Frontier Market Firms

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Visit cctrends.cipe.org, our new site just for anti-corruption compliance in emerging and frontier markets.

“Among a people generally corrupt, liberty cannot long exist.” - Edmund Burke

Until recently, corruption has been accepted and treated as a cultural norm in countries across the world. Increasingly, thanks to the efforts of organizations like Transparency International (TI) and a range of business groups, nonprofits, and government initiatives, the private sector is now openly talking about corruption. But to make significant progress, not just multinationals but also domestic companies in emerging and frontier markets need to believe in the business case for anti-corruption compliance.

As a community we are at a crossroads, as a wide range of actors have not only come to realize the destructive nature of corruption but are putting their heads together to create the conditions necessary to combat it.

TI-USA’s new report on Verification of Corporate Anti-Corruption Programs, the project of extensive research and consultation, marks an important step towards a unified vision of what successful anti-corruption compliance programs should look like. At a July 24 event presenting TI’s key findings and recommendations on corporate compliance, Andrew Wilson, CIPE’s Deputy Director for Strategic Planning and Programs, shared his views as part of a panel that included speakers from TI, Siemens AG, and Tyco.

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Now Accepting Applications for CIPE Internships

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Internships are often great stepping stones to a full-time career, which is why the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) is excited to announce that we are now accepting applications for our 2014 Internship Program at our headquarters in Washington, DC. If you are passionate about supporting international development and private sector engagement in policymaking, then landing an internship at CIPE may be exactly what you are looking for.

I still remember my first internship in the summer following my high school graduation. I had the opportunity to join a human rights organization in Boston, and I was eager to see what the nine-to-five professional experience felt like. What I discovered were colleagues who were deeply passionate about their work and wholeheartedly committed to passing on their knowledge to me. And I consider myself fortunate that I had many positive internship experiences prior to graduating from college.

So what makes an internship great? I believe it boils down to this: the opportunity to gain practical skillsets, the ability to take on projects from start to finish, the availability of professional development resources, and the access to the organization’s network.

In the fall of 2014, CIPE will offer current undergraduates and recent graduates all of the above. Interns will have the opportunity to participate in career development sessions, skills-building workshops, and to attend other local professional events. You can find out more information on our website, and we highly encourage professionals to forward this opportunity to their networks.

Richard Chen is a Program Assistant for the Middle East & North Africa at CIPE.

The Fragile States Index 2013: A Snapshot of Global Stability

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The year 2013 proved to be politically dynamic, with many countries seeing political strife or even regime change — among other crises, Ukrainians took the streets to demand more political and economic freedoms and closer ties with the West and the civil war in Syria raged on. The Fragile States Index (FSI) attempts to measure the factors driving such upheaval on a country-by-country basis.

Created by The Fund for Peace and published by Foreign Policy, for ten years the FSI has tried to put into perspective the relative stability of nations and rank them accordingly. The index develops an aggregate total score for each country by taking in a host of different social, political, economic factors: demographic pressure, the quantity of refugees and internally displaced persons, group grievances, human flight and brain drain, the unevenness of economic development, poverty and economic decline, state legitimacy, public services, human rights and the rule of law, the security apparatus, factionalized elites, and external intervention.

According the FSI, the lower the score, the more stable the country. This year’s index is lead by Finland in 178th place, receiving the lowest total score of 18.7, with relative newcomer South Sudan ranking 1st with an aggregate 112.9 (the United States is close to the top, occupying 159th place with a score of 35.4).

One conclusion established by the FSI is that states rarely fundamentally change from year to year. For instance, 9 out of 10 of 2013’s most fragile states still occupy the lowest spots. That being said, the FSI is useful for determining significant and surprising developments and trends. This year’s notable changes and scores included:

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