Author Archives: CIPE Staff

Ready or Not? Assessing Change Readiness is Crucial for Implementation of the SDGs


By Stephanie Bandyk and Laura Van Voorhees

As the U.N. General Assembly delegates return to their countries after setting the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) agenda, members now face the task of making this ambitious set of goals a reality. Despite the rigor put into crafting the goals and indicators, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Therefore for effective implementation that takes into account each country’s respective set of challenges, public and private enterprise, governments, and people and civil society can use KPMG’s 2015 Change Readiness Index (CRI) to advise their implementation strategies.

“Change readiness” is defined by the index as the capability of a country – its government, private and public enterprises, people and wider civil society – to anticipate, prepare for, manage and respond to a wide range of change drivers, proactively cultivating the resulting opportunities, and mitigating potential negative impacts.

The CRI tagline, “no government, business, or society is immune to change,” reflects that siloed improvements — for example, rise in GDP without strong governance and rule of law mechanisms — may merely be temporary developments. In fact, some overall findings of the 2015 CRI show that wealth generation alone is not enough for change readiness. In order for the post-2015 development agenda to indeed be sustainable, it is crucial to build resilience from the community to global levels to both overcome financial and social shocks as well as capitalize on political and economic opportunities such as technology, competition, and transitions in government.

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The Entrepreneurship Café – Advancing Entrepreneurship, Lebanese-style


By Rami Shamma and Stephen Rosenlund

The Lebanese have contributed to the Middle East (and for that matter the wider world) a renowned tradition of arts and design, which was no less evident than in the Development for People and Nature Association’s (DPNA’s) fourth consecutive year of Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW) programming. A leading GEW partner in Lebanon and longtime CIPE partner, DPNA used this year’s celebration of entrepreneurship as an opportunity to bring its new series of “Entrepreneurship Cafés” to Beirut.

With CIPE’s support, DPNA is hosting a series of six Entrepreneurship Cafés across Lebanon to identify the priorities of young people to build a culture of entrepreneurship and reform the entrepreneurship ecosystem in Lebanon. Unlike traditional roundtable-style workshops, these events are designed to evoke the free flow of ideas, candor, and creativity of Lebanon’s café culture. Each café brings together young people from the community to discuss various dimensions of the entrepreneurship ecosystem – personal, familial, financial, legal, societal, governmental, and media – and to identify solutions to the challenges they are facing.

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Could Rana Plaza Help Make Labor Standards a Corruption Issue?


In recent years, the private sector has been increasingly responsive to supply chain issues. This is a result of two distinct forces – one related to corruption, and the other related to issues such as human trafficking and child and other labor issues. While the focus on corruption has largely resulted from legislation such as the FCPA and UKBA, interest in labor-related supply chain issues has often been spurred by NGOs, public pressure, and the media.

However, investigations resulting from the Rana Plaza garment factory collapse may change that. On April 24, 2013, over 1,130 people were killed in the building collapse while many employees were making clothing for western companies. While the accident and the resulting public outcry drove some companies to sign accords promising to establish fire and building safety programs, other companies did nothing.

In July of this year, the Bangladesh Anti-Corruption Agency filed charges against 18 people in connection with the disaster, finding that they “grossly breached the building code.” Although bribery may have played a role in the accident — municipal workers were held liable for giving Rana permission to build more floors on top of the existing structure, although they had no authority to do so — the commission’s decision makes no mention of bribery or corruption. Instead, they hold private sector actors accountable directly on the basis of violating local building codes.

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Teach a (Wo)man How to Fish: The Changing World of International Development

Coalition members meet with political parties. (Photo: @sentellbarnes, IRI)

Members of CIPE-supported business coalitions in Nigeria meet with political parties. (Photo: @sentellbarnes, IRI)

By Laura Boyette and Teodora Mihaylova

It is only natural that the world of international development would itself develop and change over the years to adapt to the changing landscape of needs and local capacity.

At a panel discussion at Georgetown University entitled “The Changing World of International Development,” three development practitioners from leading organizations provided some insight into how their work has changed over the years. The speakers emphasized how local ownership has become central to the planning and implementation of their projects.

Traditionally, the development field was focused on delivery of goods and services, especially in regions suffering humanitarian crises due to natural disasters or conflict. Over the years as the importance of local ownership of development projects became evident, the development landscape shifted to focus more on the provision of supplies and money to local actors to deploy as they saw fit. Both approaches have limitations: a mismatch between resources available and local needs, limited local capacity, delays that significantly diminish chances of success, and often corrupt actors at various points of delivery.

These days, international development actors are focusing more on building local capacity and less on the delivery of goods and services. Building local capacity in service delivery, project management, governance, advocacy, and democratic institutions does not just meet the immediate needs of the community. It also increases the sustainability of development interventions beyond the life of a particular project. Increasing local capacity both ensures the success of the project and creates a multiplier effect as local organizations take over responsibility.

CIPE’s model is locally oriented and and locally driven. Building local capacity has been central to the CIPE strategy for 30 years. Whether it’s through our national business agenda process or through legislative outreach programs that help educate local members of parliament or assembly on the economic and democratic policies and their potential impact, CIPE’s international work focuses on empowering local partners to become agents of change in their communities.

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The Role of Business Associations in Democracy

Network members attending the meeting in Abidjan.

Members of a CIPE-supported business association network attend a meeting in Abidjan.

Business associations contribute immensely to economic growth, development, peace, and prosperity.  They play a key role in building inclusive entrepreneurship ecosystems and can bolster the ability of firms of all sizes to grow and create jobs.

Business associations are integral to the democratic process, as they represent the entrepreneurial interests of the middle class, thereby making them essential vehicles for popular participation in a democratic society.

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Training Political Parties for Democracy


A new Congress is inaugurated in Colombia.

Strong and well-functioning political parties are an essential component to any thriving democracy.  Political parties link citizens and their governments, represent the interests of constituents, and influence economic policymaking. In any political system, a party’s capacity to influence policy determines its success, so party platforms are instrumental for parties to participate effectively in the discussion and implementation of policies.  The party platform outlines a set of policy alternatives that the party seeks to implement.  The economic component of a party platform is crucial to create and implement policies that deliver economic growth and opportunities to people.

The ideas presented in political party’s economic platform will influence the operation of businesses and shape national economic policy. These platforms are not static documents as they continually evolve and respond to the challenges a country faces at a particular moment in time.  Successful political parties will be ready to revise and adapt the economic component of their platforms to changing economic conditions. Training political parties to not only develop solid economic platforms but to revise and respond to ever changing economic conditions is an important initiative in the efforts to support thriving market oriented democracies.

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Youth Entrepreneurship at CIPE


Youth play a vital role in shaping the future of every country in the world and yet they are often excluded from the economic and political decision-making process.  For those countries in the world that are striving for democracy based on market-oriented reforms, young people must play an active role as youth entrepreneurs expand opportunities, unleash individual initiative and help to cultivate individual citizens who have a stake in society and democratic governance.

CIPE recognizes the important role youth play in fostering democracy and the free market in developing countries.  As a result, CIPE focuses on building skills through entrepreneurship and management programs and supporting chambers of commerce and business associations that provide networking, services, and forums for young leaders.

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